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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

The following notes refer to the closely related species C. officinalis, they probably also apply to this species[K]:- Fruit - raw or cooked[1][2]. The fully ripe fruit is quite pleasant but slightly astringent[K]. It is about 1.5cm long[3]. The fruit contains about 8.6% sugars, 2.9% malic acid, 0.74% ash[4].

Fruit

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Cornus chinensis.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The fruit is used medicinally for similar treatments as Cornus officinalis[5]. These are:-

Shan Zhu Yu has been used for at least 2,000 years in Chinese herbal medicine. It is a herb that \"stabilizes and binds\" and is used principally to reduce heavy menstrual bleeding and unusually active secretions including copious sweating, excessive urine, spermatorrhoea and premature ejaculation[6][7][8]. Like all herbs that suppress bodily fluids (even excessive ones), it will simply prolong or lead to a worsening of symptoms if it is used without tonic or detoxifying herbs[8]. It is, therefore, normally used in combination with herbs such as Rehmannia glutinosa and is an ingredient of the \"Pill of eight ingredients\" which is used in China to \"warm up and invigorate the yang of the loins\"[8]. The fruit is antibacterial, antifungal, hypotensive, antitumor, astringent, diuretic, hepatic and tonic[9][6][10][11][7]. The fruit, without the seed, is decocted for the treatment of arthritis, fever and a wide range of other ailments[12]. It is used in the treatment of senile lumbago, diabetes, cystitis, tinnitus etc[13][8]. The fruit has an antibacterial action, inhibiting the growth of Bacillus dysenteriae and Staphylococcus[10]. The fruit is harvested when fully ripe and is dried for later use[7]. The stem bark is astringent, antimalarial and tonic[12].

The plant is antibacterial, diuretic, hypotensive and a urinary antiseptic[12].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Canopy or Secondary canopy

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame or in an outdoors seedbed if there is sufficient seed[14][15]. The seed must be separated from the fruit flesh since this contains germination inhibitors[14][16]. Stored seed should be cold stratified for 3 - 4 months and sown as early as possible in the year[16]. Scarification may also help as may a period of warm stratification before the cold stratification[14][16]. Germination, especially of stored seed, can be very slow, taking 18 months or more[16]. Prick out the seedlings of cold-frame sown seeds into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow the plants on for their first winter in a greenhouse, planting out in the spring after the last expected frosts.

Cuttings of half-ripe side shoots, July/August in a frame. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, taken with a heel if possible, autumn in a cold frame. High percentage[17].

Layering of new growth in June/July. Takes 9 months[17].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cornus chinensis. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in any soil of good or moderate fertility[18], ranging from acid to shallow chalk[3]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Succeeds in full sun or light shade[[19]. Prefers semi-shade[20].

Plants are not very cold-tolerant, they succeed outdoors only in the milder areas of the country where winter temperatures do not fall below about -5°c[21][3]. A specimen growing in a fairly open sunny position at Kew Gardens in April 1999 was about 10 years old and 2 metres tall. It had no sign of flowers, though it is obviously more cold hardy than believed since it has already tolerated temperatures rather lower than -5°c[K]. This species is very closely related to C. mas and C. officinalis, differing mainly in having black instead of red fruit[21][3].

Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[3].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cornus chinensis. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cornus chinensis.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cornus chinensis
Genus
Cornus
Family
Cornaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
8
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.53.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre (1977-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.2 [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.2 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.4 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 Brooklyn Botanic Garden Oriental Herbs and Vegetables, Vol 39 No. 2. Brooklyn Botanic Garden (1986-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    12. ? 12.012.112.212.3 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.1 Kariyone. T. Atlas of Medicinal Plants. ()
    14. ? 14.014.114.2 McMillan-Browse. P. Hardy Woody Plants from Seed. Grower Books ISBN 0-901361-21-6 (1985-00-00)
    15. ? Dirr. M. A. and Heuser. M. W. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation. Athens Ga. Varsity Press ISBN 0942375009 (1987-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.116.216.3 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-00-00)
    17. ? 17.017.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    18. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    19. ? Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
    20. ? Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls Collins ISBN 0-00-219220-0 (1983-00-00)
    21. ? 21.021.121.2 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)