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Uses

Toxic parts

The leaves are toxic if eaten[1]. The plant can also cause skin allergies in sensitive people[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Seed - after removing the bitterness[2][3]. No more details are given, but the bitterness in seeds is usually removed either by leaching them in water or by thoroughly cooking them[K].

Material uses

Tolerant of regular trimming, though not into old wood, it can be grown as a dense hedge[4].

A yellow dye is obtained from the young branches[5].

Wood - durable in the soil, moderately hard, close grained, rather coarse grained, light, soft, brittle. Used for construction, cabinet making, cooperage[5][6][4][7].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

This plant is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs[8].

The leaves are antibacterial, antipyretic, antitussive, astringent, diuretic, emmenagogue, emollient, expectorant, febrifuge, haemostatic, refrigerant and stomachic[9][10][8][1]. Their use is said to improve the growth of hair[9][10][1]. They are used internally in the treatment of coughs, haemorrhages, excessive menstruation, bronchitis, asthma, skin infections, mumps, bacterial dysentery, arthritic pain and premature baldness[1]. The leaves are harvested for use as required and can be used fresh or dried[1]. This remedy should not be prescribed to pregnant women[1]. The seed is aperient, lenitive and sedative[9][10][8]. It is used internally in the treatment of palpitations, insomnia, nervous disorders and constipation in the elderly[1]. The root bark is used in the treatment of burns and scalds[8].

The stems are used in the treatment of coughs, colds, dysentery, rheumatism and parasitic skin diseases[8].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Canopy

Ecological Functions

Hedge

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown when ripe in the autumn in a cold frame. Stored seed germinates best if given a short cold stratification. It can then be sown in a cold frame in late winter. Plants make very little growth in their first year[11]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

If there is sufficient seed it is worthwhile trying a sowing in an outdoor seed bed in April[11]. Grow the plants on for at least two years before planting them out in the winter. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 8cm with a heel, July/August in a shaded frame. Forms roots by the end of September but should be overwintered in a frame[11].

Cuttings of almost ripe wood, 5 - 10cm with a heel, September in a cold frame. Forms roots in the following summer. Plant out in autumn or spring[11].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Thuja orientalis. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moist loamy soil[4]. Grows best on dry freely draining sites, often alkaline in reaction[12]. Does well over old building rubble[12]. Tolerant of dry dusty sites and of atmospheric pollution in towns[13]. Prefers a sunny sheltered position[1].

Easily transplanted[4]. There are many named varieties selected for their ornamental value. Produces seed freely in cultivation[12]. A slow growing tree, it does not really thrive in Britain[14], especially in the western part of the country[12]. The best specimens are to be found in towns or cities such as Oxford and very sharply drained soils in gardens[15]. Plants cannot regenerate from old wood. Pruning is not normally necessary for this species, any pruning that is carried out should be done with care[1].

Plants are susceptible to attacks by honey fungus[1].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Thuja orientalis. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Thuja orientalis.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Thuja orientalis
Genus
Thuja
Family
Cupressaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Drought
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
15 x 5 meters
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.001.011.021.031.041.051.061.071.081.091.101.11 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.1 Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre (1977-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.4 Vines. R. A. Trees of Central Texas. University of Texas Press ISBN 0-292-78958-3 (1987-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Gamble. J. S. A Manual of Indian Timbers. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh (1972-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.1 Vines. R.A. Trees of North Texas University of Texas Press. ISBN 0292780206 (1982-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.5 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.19.29.3 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
  10. ? 10.010.110.210.3 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.211.3 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.112.212.312.4 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  13. ? Rushforth. K. Conifers. Christopher Helm ISBN 0-7470-2801-X (1987-00-00)
  14. ? 14.014.1 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
  15. ? Mitchell. A. F. Conifers in the British Isles. HMSO ISBN 0-11-710012-9 (1975-00-00)


Facts about "Thuja orientalis"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyCupressaceae +
Belongs to genusThuja +
Functions asHedge +
Has common nameBiota +
Has drought toleranceTolerant +
Has edible partSeeds +
Has edible useUnknown use +
Has environmental toleranceDrought +
Has fertility typeWind +
Has flowers of typeMonoecious +
Has growth rateSlow +
Has hardiness zone6 +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useDye + and Wood +
Has mature height15 +
Has mature width5 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAntiasthmatic +, Antibacterial +, Antipyretic +, Antitussive +, Aperient +, Astringent +, Diuretic +, Emmenagogue +, Emollient +, Expectorant +, Haemostatic +, Lenitive +, Parasiticide +, Sedative +, Skin + and Stomachic +
Has search namethuja orientalis + and x +
Has shade toleranceLight shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral +, Alkaline + and Very alkaline +
Has soil teclayture preferenceClay +
Has soil teloamyture preferenceLoamy +
Has soil tesandyture preferenceSandy +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomy nameThuja orientalis +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Inhabits ecosystem nicheCanopy +
Is deciduous or evergreenEvergreen +
Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +