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Uses

Toxic parts

One report suggests the plant may be poisonous[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Young leaves and leaf stems - cooked[2][3]. One report suggests the plant may be poisonous[1].

Leaves

Material uses

An essential oil is obtained from the leaves, used in perfumery[1]. A useful ground cover plant, succeeding in dense shade, though rather slow spreading[4]. Plants should be spaced about 60cm apart each way[5].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The flowers are said to have anticancer activity[6].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Ground cover

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in a lightly shaded position in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 3 months at 10°c. Make sure you keep the compost moist. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Division is possible at almost any time of the year so long as there is sufficient moisture[7]. It is best carried out in March as growth commences or in early autumn if the soil is not too dry[8]. Hostas can be left undivided for many years and should not be divided any more frequently than once every 3 - 5 years to allow the leaves to reach maturity[8].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Hosta plantaginae. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Thrives in most fertile soils if they are rich in humus[8]. Grows well in heavy clay soils and in sandy ones[5]. Very limy soils inhibit growth, but plants can thrive in such a situation if plenty of humus is added[5]. Prefers a pH between 6 and 7[8]. Requires a rich soil that does not dry out readily[9]. Succeeds in full sun as well as in deep shade, growing well in the semi-shade of a woodland[8][7]. In general, the sunnier the position the moister the soil should be[7]. Plants are best not grown under trees in town gardens since the soot washed from the leaves of the trees in wet weather will tend to remain on the hosta[5]. Plants flower better when grown in a sunny position but the foliage is better when the plant is in a shady position[8]. This species tolerates quite a lot of sun[10].

Plants are in general fully hardy in Britain, but young leaves in spring can be destroyed by frost. New leaves are only produced in the spring and very early summer, so any damage at this time has a deep effect on the plant[7]. The plant forms open clumps[8]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits[7]. Plants are very attractive to slugs and snails, the young shoots in spring are especially at risk[111, K]. A very ornamental plant[9], there are some named varieties[10]. The flowers open in the evening[11] and have a delicious lily-like fragrance[7]. The plant only flowers well when grown in a warm position[7], and is not really satisfactory when grown in most areas north of London[12]..

Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[8].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Hosta plantaginae. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Hosta plantaginae.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Hosta plantaginae
Genus
Hosta
Family
Funkiaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    2. ? 2.02.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Royal Horticultural Society. Ground Cover Plants. Cassells. ISBN 0-304-31089-1 (1989-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.4 Thomas. G. S. Plants for Ground Cover J. M. Dent & Sons ISBN 0-460-12609-1 (1990-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.6 Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.58.68.78.8 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Perennials Volumes 1 and 2. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30936-9 (1991-00-00)
    11. ? Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
    12. ? Grenfell. Diana The Gardener's Guide to Growing Hostas David &Charles ISBN 0-7153-0431-3 (1996-00-00)
    13. ? [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)


    Facts about "Hosta plantaginae"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyFunkiaceae +
    Belongs to genusHosta +
    Functions asGround cover +
    Has binomial nameHosta plantaginae +
    Has common nameAugust Lily +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partLeaves + and Stem +
    Has edible useUnknown use +
    Has fertility typeInsects +
    Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
    Has hardiness zone4 +
    Has lifecycle typePerennial +
    Has material partUnknown part +
    Has material useEssential +
    Has mature height0.6 +
    Has mature width1.2 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useCancer +
    Has search namehosta plantaginae + and august lily +
    Has shade tolerancePermanent shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy +, Clay + and Heavy clay +
    Has sun preferenceFull sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameHosta plantaginae +
    Has water requirementsmoderate +
    Inhabits ecosystem nicheSoil surface +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
    Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Hosta plantaginae +, Hosta plantaginae +, Hosta plantaginae + and Hosta plantaginae +