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Uses

Toxic parts

The sap contains a latex which is toxic on ingestion and highly irritant externally, causing photosensitive skin reactions and severe inflammation, especially on contact with eyes or open cuts. The toxicity can remain high even in dried plant material[1]. Prolonged and regular contact with the sap is inadvisable because of its carcinogenic nature[2].

Edible uses

Notes

Stems and leaves - cooked. They are boiled, soaked in water, squeezed and then eaten[3]. Caution is advised, see the notes on toxicity above.

Leaves

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Euphorbia sieboldiana.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The roots are diuretic and laxative[4]. They are crushed and swallowed with water in the treatment of schistosomiasis-caused ascites, oedema and constipation[4]. This plant is poisonous and should be used with caution, preferably only under the supervision of a qualified herbalist[K].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in a shaded cold frame[1]. Germination usually takes place within 2 - 3 weeks at 20°c.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Euphorbia sieboldiana. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

We have very little information on this species and do not know if it will be hardy in Britain, though judging by its native range it should succeed outdoors in most parts of this country. It is a polymorphic species[5]. Chinese and Korean plants to which the name, Euphorbia sieboldiana has been applied, differ from Japanese one in irregularly toothed but not ciliated lobes of involucres. Moreover, E. sieboldiana in Japan includes three or more well distinct forms which are easily distinguished each other in morphology of rhizomes, leaves and bracteoles and have different distributions and habitats. These may be recognized as distinct species, but further studies are desirable[6]. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus.

Prefers a light well-drained moderately rich loam in an open position[1]. Succeeds in dry soils[7]. Hybridizes with other members of this genus[1]. The ripe seed is released explosively from the seed capsules[1]. Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer or rabbits[8].

This genus has been singled out as a potential source of latex (for making rubber) for the temperate zone, although no individual species has been singled out[9].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Euphorbia sieboldiana. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Euphorbia sieboldiana.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Euphorbia sieboldiana
Genus
Euphorbia
Family
Euphorbiaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    2. ? Matthews. V. The New Plantsman. Volume 1, 1994. Royal Horticultural Society ISBN 1352-4186 (1994-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
    5. ? 5.05.1 Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 www.foj.info Flora of Japan ()
    7. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    8. ? Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
    9. ? Carruthers. S. P. (Editor) Alternative Enterprises for Agriculture in the UK. Centre for Agricultural Strategy, Univ. of Reading ISBN 0704909820 (1986-00-00)