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Uses

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Cupressocyparis leylandii.

Material uses

Plants can be grown as a windbreak hedge succeeding in very exposed positions and reasonably tolerant of maritime exposure[1][2]. They can suffer wind burn after prolonged storms but usually recover quickly[2]. Very fast growing, it can be trimmed so long as it is not cut back into old wood[1][3]. Only young plants should be used for shelterbelts in exposed positions and these must not be pot-bound or they will never become really wind firm[1]. This species has been much used for hedging in urban gardens but it is singularly unsuitable for this purpose[3]. Although it very quickly provides a screen, it is much too vigorous for most gardens and will need constant attention to keep it within bounds[3].
There are no material uses listed for Cupressocyparis leylandii.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Cupressocyparis leylandii.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Canopy

Ecological Functions

Hedge


Windbreak

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 7cm with a heel, July/August in sandy soil in a humid frame[1]. Strikes readily. Cuttings from side growths in March[1].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cupressocyparis leylandii. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it prefers a moist fertile soil but also succeeds in sandy soils[4] and tolerates calcareous conditions[5]. Very wind resistant, it tolerates salt-laden winds and maritime exposure[1].

A very fast growing tree, capable of reaching 20 metres within 20 years[6]. A number of different clones are available[6][3]. The Leyland cypress has been widely planted for hedging in recent years, though it is singularly unsuited for this purpose in all but the largest of sites[3]. The plant has gained the reputation of being very bad for wildlife since it offers native species very little in the way of food. However, it is favoured by many birds for roosting, high cover and especially for nesting because it offers such good cover. Our 12 hectare site was totally devoid of trees when we took it over in 1989, five years later we had our first birds nesting in trees on the land - in 4 metre tall Leyland cypresses![K]. Large specimens of this tree help to attract songbirds to the garden[3]. The bruised foliage has a sweet resinous scent[5].

Trees are notably susceptible to honey fungus[3].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cupressocyparis leylandii. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cupressocyparis leylandii.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cupressocyparis leylandii
Genus
Cupressocyparis
Family
Cupressaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
  • Maritime exposure
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
40 x 5 meters
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.41.51.61.7 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.12.2 Rosewarne experimental horticultural station. Shelter Trees and Hedges. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (1984-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.53.63.73.8 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  4. ? Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.1 Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Mitchell. A. F. Conifers in the British Isles. HMSO ISBN 0-11-710012-9 (1975-00-00)