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Uses

Toxic parts

If the plant is infected with the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, skin contact with the sap can cause dermatitis in sensitive people[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Leaves - used as a flavouring in soups etc[2]. They can be eaten raw but have a very strong flavour[3].

Seed - a flavouring. An essential oil from the seed is also used as a flavouring.

Root - raw or cooked[4][5][3]. It can be grated and added to salads, baked or added to soups, stews etc[6].

Unknown part

Leaves

Material uses

The growing plant is an insect repellent, it repels the cabbage white butterfly so is a good companion for brassicas[7].
There are no material uses listed for Apium graveolens rapaceum.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Although not as medicinally active as wild celery, the cultivated forms of celery also have the same medicinal properties and, when used as an item of the diet, will have a similar effect upon the body. These medicinal uses are as follows:-

Wild celery is an aromatic bitter tonic herb that reduces blood pressure, relieves indigestion, stimulates the uterus and is anti-inflammatory[8]. The ripe seeds, herb and root are aperient, carminative, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, nervine, stimulant and tonic[9][10][11][12]. Wild celery is said to be useful in cases of hysteria, promoting restfulness and sleep and diffusing through the system a mild sustaining influence[9]. The herb should not be prescribed for pregnant women[8]. Seeds purchased for cultivation purposes are often dressed with a fungicide, they should not be used for medicinal purposes[8]. The root is harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried[8]. The whole plant is harvested when fruiting and is usually liquidized to extract the juice[8]. The seeds are harvested as they ripen and are dried for later use[8]. An essential oil obtained from the plant has a calming effect on the central nervous system. Some of its constituents have antispasmodic, sedative and anticonvulsant actions. It has been shown to be of value in treating high blood pressure[13].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the herb[14]. It is used in treating rheumatism and kidney complaints[14].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - surface sow February in a greenhouse. The maincrop can be sown as late as mid-April. Germinates in 2 - 3 weeks at 15°c. Plant out in May. The seed can harbour certain diseases of celery, it is usually treated by seed companies before being sold but if you save your own seed you should make sure that only seed from healthy plants is used[15].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Apium graveolens rapaceum. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a rich moist soil and an open sunny situation[15][4][5][3]. Requires abundant moisture in the growing season otherwise the root will be small and tough[15]. Tolerates a pH in the range 5.2 to 8.3.

The root is hardy to about -12°c and can be left in the ground over winter, to be harvested as required[2]. Roots can also be stored in boxes of sand or other such material in a cool dry shed[2]. Celeriac is a form of A. graveolens that has been selected for its enlarged edible root. It is occasionally cultivated commercially but more often in the garden or allotment[16][2], there are some named varieties[6]. Any side-shoots should be removed in order to encourage a larger root[2].

A good companion plant for leeks, tomatoes, French beans and brassicas[17].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Apium graveolens rapaceum. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Apium graveolens rapaceum.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Apium graveolens rapaceum
Genus
Apium
Family
Umbelliferae
Imported References
Edible uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
Shade
partial shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? Frohne. D. and Pf?nder. J. A Colour Atlas of Poisonous Plants. Wolfe ISBN 0723408394 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.52.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Larkcom. J. Salads all the Year Round. Hamlyn (1980-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Vilmorin. A. The Vegetable Garden. Ten Speed Press ISBN 0-89815-041-8 ()
    5. ? 5.05.15.2 Organ. J. Rare Vegetables for Garden and Table. Faber (1960-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.2 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening. Garden Way, Vermont, USA. ISBN 0-88266-064-0 (1978-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.58.6 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
    13. ? 13.013.1 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.114.2 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.115.2 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    16. ? Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    17. ? Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants. Watkins (1979-00-00)