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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Root - cooked[1][2][3][4][5]. It is usually steeped in water prior to cooking in order to remove any bitterness[6]. The root is rich in starch[7], when baked it becomes sweet and mealy[8][9], somewhat like a sweet potato[10]. The root is usually harvested in the autumn and will store for several months[11].

Leaves and young stems - cooked[12][8][9][10]. Seed - raw or cooked[2][3][4][8][9]. A very agreeable taste[6][5]. The seed can be dried, ground into a powder and used for making bread, thickening soups etc or can be eaten dry[12][10]. The bitter tasting embryo is often removed. The half-ripe seed is said to be delicious raw or cooked, with a taste like chestnuts[10]. The seed contains up to 19% protein[13].

An edible oil can be extracted from the seed[14].

Unknown part

Oil

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Nelumbo lutea.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The root is pounded into a pulp, either fresh or dried, and used as a poultice for many inflammatory diseases[14].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - file the seed across its centre, being very careful not to damage the flesh of the seed, and soak in warm water, changing the water twice a day until signs of germination are seen, which should be within 3 - 4 weeks at 25°c. Plant in individual pots just covered in water and increase the depth as the plant grows. Division in spring as the plant comes into growth. Be very careful, the plants deeply resent root disturbance[15].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Nelumbo lutea. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a rich loam[1] and a sunny position[16]. Succeeds in most soils[1]. Succeeds in water up to 0.6m deep[16].

Plants are half-hardy[16]. They should be hardy in the mild areas of Britain[1]. Grown as a food plant by the N. American Indians[1], it has been proposed for commercial cultivation[17].

The flowers are fragrant[18].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Nelumbo lutea. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Nelumbo lutea.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Nelumbo lutea
Genus
Nelumbo
Family
Nelumbonaceae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
  • Unknown part (Oil)
  • Root (Unknown use)
  • Seed (Unknown use)
  • Stem (Unknown use)
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
  • Unknown part (Poultice)
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
aquatic
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.41.5 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.3 Fernald. M. L. Gray's Manual of Botany. American Book Co. (1950-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.2 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Harris. B. C. Eat the Weeds. Pivot Health (1973-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.2 McPherson. A. and S. Wild Food Plants of Indiana. Indiana University Press ISBN 0-253-28925-4 (1977-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.2 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.3 Saunders. C. F. Edible and Useful Wild Plants of the United States and Canada. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-23310-3 (1976-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.29.3 Turner. N. J. and Szczawinski. A. Edible Wild Fruits and Nuts of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences (1978-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.210.310.4 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.112.2 Elias. T. and Dykeman. P. A Field Guide to N. American Edible Wild Plants. Van Nostrand Reinhold ISBN 0442222009 (1982-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.1 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.114.214.3 Coffey. T. The History and Folklore of North American Wild Flowers. Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-2624-6 (1993-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.1 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.116.2 Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
    17. ? Coon. N. The Dictionary of Useful Plants. Rodale Press ISBN 0-87857-090-x (1975-00-00)
    18. ? Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
    19. ? Britton. N. L. Brown. A. An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada Dover Publications. New York. ISBN 0-486-22642-5 (1970-00-00)