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Uses

Toxic parts

The dried leaves can be toxic. though the fresh leaves are quite safe to use. This is possibly due to the presence of coumarin, the substance that gives some dried plants the smell of new mown hay, if taken internally it can prevent the blood clotting.

Edible uses

Notes

Root[1][2][3]. Consumed as a food by the Kalmuks[4].

Young shoots - cooked. Used like asparagus[4]. Young leaves are eaten in salads[5]. The leaves and seedpods are cooked as a vegetable[6][7][3]. They are used as a flavouring[1]. Only fresh leaves should be used, see the notes above on toxicity[8]. The crushed dried leaves can be used as a vanilla flavouring in puddings, pastries etc[9][4][10]. Caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

Flowers - raw or cooked[3]. The flowers and seeds are used as a flavouring[11]. The flowers also give an aromatic quality to some tisanes[12].

Unknown part

Flowers

Leaves

Seedpod

Material uses

The leaves contain coumarin and they release the pleasant smell of newly mown hay when they are drying[10]. The leaves are dried and used as an insect repellent[13][3], especially in order to repel moths from clothing[5][14][10]. They can be put in pillows, mattresses etc[15].

Poorly dried or fermented leaves produce a substance called dicoumarol. This is a potent anti-coagulant which is extremely poisonous in excess, it prevents the blood from coagulating and so it is possible to bleed to death from very small wounds. Dicoumarol is used in rat poisons[10].

The plant can be used as a green manure, enriching the soil with nitrogen as well a providing organic matter[10].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Melilot, used either externally or internally, can help treat varicose veins and haemorrhoids though it requires a long-term treatment for the effect to be realised[16]. Use of the plant also helps to reduce the risk of phlebitis and thrombosis[16]. Melilot contains coumarins and, as the plant dries or spoils, these become converted to dicoumarol, a powerful anticoagulant[16]. Thus the plant should be used with some caution, it should not be prescribed to patients with a history of poor blood clotting or who are taking warfarin medication[10]. See also the notes above on toxicity[17].

The flowering plant is antispasmodic, aromatic, carminative, diuretic, emollient, mildly expectorant, mildly sedative and vulnerary[18][12][19][5][17][10][20]. An infusion is used in the treatment of sleeplessness, nervous tension, neuralgia, palpitations, varicose veins, painful congestive menstruation, in the prevention of thrombosis, flatulence and intestinal disorders[12][10]. Externally, it is used to treat eye inflammations, rheumatic pains, swollen joints, severe bruising, boils and erysipelas, whilst a decoction is added to the bath-water[19][10]. The flowering plant is harvested in the summer and can be dried for later use[12].

A distilled water obtained from the flowering tops is an effective treatment for conjunctivitis[12].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Green manure


Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring to mid-summer in situ[21]. Pre-soaking the seed for 12 hours in warm water will speed up the germination process, particularly in dry weather[K]. Germination will usually take place within 2 weeks.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Melilotus officinalis. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a well-drained to dry neutral to alkaline soil in a sunny position[10]. Prefers a clay or a saline soil[5]. Dislikes shade. Established plants are drought tolerant[10].

The flowers are rich in pollen making this a good bee plant[18][12][6][5]. If they are cut back before flowering, the plants will grow on for at least another year before dying[22]. The dried plant has a sweet aromatic fragrance like newly mown hay[23].

This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[24].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Melilotus officinalis. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Melilotus officinalis.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Melilotus officinalis
Genus
Melilotus
Family
Leguminosae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Salinity
  • Drought
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type

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"image:Melilotus officinalis01.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Melilotus officinalis01.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


"image:Melilotus officinalis01.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


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References

  1. ? 1.01.11.2 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.5 Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.55.65.7 Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.16.2 Ceres. Free for All. Thorsons Publishers ISBN 0-7225-0445-4 (1977-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.1 Harris. B. C. Eat the Weeds. Pivot Health (1973-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.1 Elias. T. and Dykeman. P. A Field Guide to N. American Edible Wild Plants. Van Nostrand Reinhold ISBN 0442222009 (1982-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
  10. ? 10.0010.0110.0210.0310.0410.0510.0610.0710.0810.0910.1010.1110.1210.13 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.112.212.312.412.512.612.7 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.1 Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden. ()
  14. ? 14.014.1 Polunin. O. Flowers of Europe - A Field Guide. Oxford University Press ISBN 0192176218 (1969-00-00)
  15. ? 15.015.1 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
  16. ? 16.016.116.216.3 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
  17. ? 17.017.117.2 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
  18. ? 18.018.118.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
  19. ? 19.019.119.2 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
  20. ? 20.020.1 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
  21. ? Woodward. L. Burge. P. Green Manures. Elm Farm Research Centre. (1982-00-00)
  22. ? Johnson. C. P. The Useful Plants of Great Britain. ()
  23. ? Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
  24. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  25. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)

"image:Melilotus officinalis01.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

Facts about "Melilotus officinalis"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyLeguminosae +
Belongs to genusMelilotus +
Functions asGreen manure + and Nitrogen fixer +
Has binomial nameMelilotus officinalis +
Has common nameMelilot +
Has drought toleranceTolerant +
Has edible partUnknown part +, Flowers +, Leaves +, Root + and Seedpod +
Has edible useCondiment + and Unknown use +
Has environmental toleranceDrought + and Salinity +
Has fertility typeBees +
Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
Has imageMelilotus officinalis01.jpg +
Has lifecycle typeAnnual + and Biennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useRepellent +
Has mature height1.2 +
Has mature width0.7 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAntispasmodic +, Aromatic +, Carminative +, Diuretic +, Emollient +, Expectorant +, Ophthalmic + and Vulnerary +
Has primary imageMelilotus officinalis01.jpg +
Has salinity toleranceTolerant +
Has search namemelilotus officinalis + and melilot +
Has shade toleranceNo shade +
Has soil ph preferenceNeutral + and Alkaline +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy +, Clay + and Heavy clay +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameMelilotus officinalis +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis +, Melilotus officinalis + and Melilotus officinalis +