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Uses

Toxic parts

The seeds are slightly poisonous to some mammals, but no cases involving people are known[1][2]. Skin contact with the plant can cause dermatitis in some people[2].

Edible uses

Notes

Leaves - raw or cooked[3][4][5]. Used in salads[6] and as a spinach[3]. The tender shoots are cooked as a vegetable[7]. It is best not to eat these leaves[8][9], see the notes above on toxicity.

Leaves

Material uses

The squeezed plant is used in Nepal for washing and bathing[7].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The scarlet pimpernel was at one time highly regarded as a medicinal herb, especially in the treatment of epilepsy and mental problems[10], but there is little evidence to support its efficacy and it is no longer recommended for internal use because it contains toxic saponins and cytotoxic cucurbitacins[9][10].

The whole herb is antitussive, cholagogue, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, nervine, purgative, stimulant and vulnerary[6][11][12][13][14]. It can be taken internally or applied externally as a poultice[11]. An infusion is used in the treatment of dropsy, skin infections and disorders of the liver and gall bladder[12][7]. The plant is best harvested in June and can be dried for later use[6]. Use with caution[13], large doses can cause polyuria and tremor[11].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the plant[12]. It is used internally to treat itchy skins and externally to remove warts[12].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in situ.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Anagallis arvensis. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a sunny position and a good soil[15]. Succeeds in dry or sandy soils[9]. The flowers open at about 8 am and close at 3pm each day, though they close earlier if it rains. The flowers are also said to foretell wet weather if they close early[16].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Anagallis arvensis. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Anagallis arvensis.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Anagallis arvensis
Genus
Anagallis
Family
Primulaceae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Cooper. M. and Johnson. A. Poisonous Plants in Britain and their Effects on Animals and Man. HMSO ISBN 0112425291 (1984-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.2 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Johnson. C. P. The Useful Plants of Great Britain. ()
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.5 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (2002-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Harris. B. C. Eat the Weeds. Pivot Health (1973-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.29.39.4 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.111.211.3 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.112.212.312.4 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.113.2 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    15. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    16. ? Coffey. T. The History and Folklore of North American Wild Flowers. Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-2624-6 (1993-00-00)
    17. ? Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named PFAFimport-17
    18. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)