This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Leaves - raw in salads or added as a flavouring to cooked foods[1][2][3][4]. Thyme retains its flavour well in long slow cooking. If the leaves are to be dried, the plants should be harvested in early and late summer just before the flowers open and the leaves should be dried quickly[5]. An aromatic tea is made from the leaves[6].

Leaves

Unknown part

Tea

Material uses

An essential oil from the leaves and flowering tops is used in perfumery, soaps, medicinally etc. It has fungicidal and disinfectant properties[7][8]. About 150 grams of oil are obtained from 100 kilos of plant material[7].

The dried flowers are used to repel moths from clothing[7]. The growing plant is said to repel cabbage root fly[9][10].

A good ground cover for a sunny position[11]. It needs weeding for the first year or so[11]. Plants are best spaced about 45cm apart each way[12]. Plants are only satisfactory when young or growing luxuriantly - they are apt to become bare in patches otherwise[12].

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Wild thyme is a commonly used domestic remedy, being employed especially for its antiseptic properties and its beneficial effect on the digestive system.

The whole plant is anthelmintic, strongly antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, deodorant, diaphoretic, disinfectant, expectorant, sedative and tonic[7][13][5][14][15]. It is taken internally in the treatment of bronchitis, catarrh, laryngitis, flatulent indigestion, painful menstruation, colic and hangovers[14]. It is said to be effective in treating alcoholism[14]. It should not be prescribed for pregnant women[14]. Externally, it is applied to minor injuries, mastitis, mouth, throat and gum infections etc[14]. The plant can be used fresh at any time of the year, or it can be harvested as it comes into flower and either be distilled for the oil or dried for later use[14]. The seeds are used as a vermifuge[16]. Wild thyme contains all the medicinal properties of the more commonly used garden thyme (T. vulgaris), though in a lesser degree[7].

An essential oil distilled from the leaves is used in the treatment of stress-related conditions, though it can cause allergic reactions[14].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Ground cover

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in a cold frame. Seed can also be sown in autumn in a greenhouse. Surface sow or barely cover the seed. Germination can be erratic. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Division in spring or autumn[5]. Larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is best to pot up smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a greenhouse or cold frame until they are growing away well. Plant them out in the summer or the following spring. Cuttings of young shoots, 5 - 8cm with a heel, May/June in a frame[5]. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 8cm with a heel, July/August in a frame[5].

Layering.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Thymus serpyllum. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a light well-drained preferably calcareous soil in a sunny position[17][5]. Succeeds in dry soils[7]. Grows well between stepping stones on paths, tolerating light treading[18][5]. Succeeds on walls. Thymes dislike wet conditions, especially in the winter. A layer of gravel on the soil around them will help protect the foliage from wet soils[14].

Plants are hardy to about -15°c[5]. This is a very difficult genus taxonomically, the species hybridize freely with each other and often intergrade into each other[5]. This species is harvested commercially for its essential oil, known as 'wild thyme'[19]. Closely related to T. praecox arcticus, but this species is not so common in Britain[2]. It is a very polymorphic plant. A good companion for most other plants[20], it makes a very good carpeting plant for the rockery or between paving stones[17] and can also be grown in a short lawn[20].

The flowers are rich in nectar and are very attractive to honey bees[5], the plant also attracts butterflies[7][8][21].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Thymus serpyllum. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Thymus serpyllum.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Thymus serpyllum
Genus
Thymus
Family
Labiatae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
5
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type

"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki."image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






References

  1. ? 1.01.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.12.22.3 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
  5. ? 5.005.015.025.035.045.055.065.075.085.095.105.115.12 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.67.77.8 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.18.2 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.1 Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants. Watkins (1979-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.1 Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening. Garden Way, Vermont, USA. ISBN 0-88266-064-0 (1978-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.2 Royal Horticultural Society. Ground Cover Plants. Cassells. ISBN 0-304-31089-1 (1989-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.112.2 Thomas. G. S. Plants for Ground Cover J. M. Dent & Sons ISBN 0-460-12609-1 (1990-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
  14. ? 14.014.114.214.314.414.514.614.714.8 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
  15. ? 15.015.1 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
  16. ? 16.016.1 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
  17. ? 17.017.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  18. ? Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
  19. ? Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
  20. ? 20.020.1 Hatfield. A. W. How to Enjoy your Weeds. Frederick Muller Ltd ISBN 0-584-10141-4 (1977-00-00)
  21. ? Baines. C. Making a Wildlife Garden. ()
  22. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)

Cite error: <ref> tag with name "PFAFimport-13" defined in <references> is not used in prior text.

"image:Illustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

Facts about "Thymus serpyllum"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyLabiatae +
Belongs to genusThymus +
Functions asGround cover +
Has common nameWild Thyme +
Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
Has edible partLeaves + and Unknown part +
Has edible useUnknown use + and Tea +
Has environmental toleranceHigh wind +
Has fertility typeBee +, Flies + and Lepidoptera +
Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
Has hardiness zone5 +
Has imageIllustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useDisinfectant +, Essential +, Fungicide + and Repellent +
Has mature height0.1 +
Has mature width0.3 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAnthelmintic +, Antiseptic +, Antispasmodic +, Carminative +, Deodorant +, Diaphoretic +, Disinfectant +, Expectorant +, Sedative + and Tonic +
Has primary imageIllustration Thymus serpyllum0.jpg +
Has search namethymus serpyllum + and x +
Has shade toleranceNo shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
Has soil teloamyture preferenceLoamy +
Has soil tesandyture preferenceSandy +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomy nameThymus serpyllum +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Inhabits ecosystem nicheSoil surface +
Is deciduous or evergreenEvergreen +
Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Tolerates windYes +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +