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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw or cooked. We have no specific information on this species, but the fruit is quite probably edible[K].
There are no edible uses listed for Schisandra sphenanthera.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Schisandra sphenanthera.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The following report is for S. chinensis. This species is used for similar purposes in southern China[1].

Wu Wei Zi is commonly used in Chinese herbalism, where it is considered to be one of the 50 fundamental herbs[2]. It is an excellent tonic and restorative, helping in stressful times and increasing zest for life[3]. It is considered to be a substitute for ginseng and is said to be a tonic for both the male and the female sex organs[1]. The fruit is antitussive, aphrodisiac, hepatic, astringent, cardiotonic, cholagogue, expectorant, hypotensive, lenitive, nervine, pectoral, sedative, stimulant and tonic[4][5][6][2]. Low doses of the fruit are said to stimulate the central nervous system whilst large doses depress it[2]. The fruit also regulates the cardiovascular system[2]. It is taken internally in the treatment of dry coughs, asthma, night sweats, urinary disorders, involuntary ejaculation, chronic diarrhoea, palpitations, insomnia, poor memory, hyperacidity, hepatitis and diabetes[1]. Externally, it is used to treat irritating and allergic skin conditions[1]. The fruit is harvested after the first frosts and sun-dried for later use[1]. The fruit contains lignans[3]. These have a pronounced protective action on the liver. In one clinical trial there was a 76% success rate in treating patients with hepatitis, no side effects were noticed[3]. The seed is used in the treatment of cancer[2]. The plant is antirheumatic[2].

A mucilaginous decoction obtained from the branches is useful in the treatment of coughs, dysentery and gonorrhoea[2].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Climber

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown in the autumn in a cold frame[7][1]. Pre-soak stored seed for 12 hours in warm water and sow in a greenhouse in the spring[1]. Germination can be slow and erratic. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in light shade in the greenhouse for their first 2 years. Plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 8cm with a heel, August in a frame. Overwinter in the greenhouse and plant out in late spring[8][9]. Good percentage[9].

Layering of long shoots in the autumn[7].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Schisandra sphenanthera. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a rich well-drained moisture retentive soil[8][7]. Prefers a slightly acid soil but tolerates some alkalinity if plenty of organic matter is added to the soil[7]. Requires some protection from the most intense sunlight[7]. Plants are intolerant of drought[K].

This species is hardy to about -7°c[7]. It will succeed outdoors in the milder areas of Britain if given the protection of a woodland or a south or west-facing wall[7]. The young growth in spring can be damaged by late frosts. Plants climb by twining around supports. Any pruning is best carried out in the spring[10].

Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Schisandra sphenanthera. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Schisandra sphenanthera.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Schisandra sphenanthera
Genus
Schisandra
Family
Schisandraceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
partial sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    ?
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    7 x meters
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.41.51.61.7 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.52.62.7 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Kariyone. T. Atlas of Medicinal Plants. ()
    5. ? 5.05.1 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.67.7 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    10. ? Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls Collins ISBN 0-00-219220-0 (1983-00-00)
    11. ? [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)