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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fresh root slices have been baked and eaten as bread[1].

The fruit is a small dry berry up to 10mm in diameter, with a thin sweet flesh[2]. Although we have seen no other records of edibility for this species, the following uses are for the related S. palmetto. They quite probably also apply here[K].

Fruit - raw or cooked[3]. Sweet and pleasant[3]. A small dry berry up to 12mm in diameter, with a thin sweet flesh[2]. A nourishing food, though it is said to be an acquired taste[3]. Young leaves - raw or cooked[4]. An excellent food[3]. The large succulent leaf buds are cooked and eaten as a vegetable[5].

Sap - sweet[3].

Fruit

Leaves

Material uses

The dried leaves are used occasionally for the thatched roofs of huts[2].

The following reports are for S. palmetto. They quite probably also apply to this species[K].

An excellent fibre is obtained from the leaf stalks[4]. The best quality is from young leaf stalks still in the bud, whilst coarser material is obtained from older leaves or the bases of old leaf stalks surrounding the bud[4]. The fibres are up to 50cm long, they are harvested commercially and used to make brushes, especially where these have to remain stiff in hot water or caustics[5][4]. Pieces of the spongy bark of the stem are used as a substitute for scrubbing brushes[5]. The leaves are woven to make coarse hats, mats and baskets[5]. The roots contain about 10% tannin[4]. This has been harvested commercially in the past but there is not really enough tannin for profitable extraction[4].

Wood - light and soft[5]. The trunks are used to make wharf piles, whilst polished cross-sections of the trunk have been used as small table tops[5]. The wood is also largely manufactured into canes[5].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The crushed, small root juice has been rubbed into sore eyes as a counterirritant[1]. A decoction of the dried root has been taken in the treatment of high blood pressure and kidney problems[1].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a warm greenhouse at not less than 24°c[6]. Stored seed is very slow to germinate. Pre-soaking the seed for 24 hours in warm water prior to sowing may shorten the germination time. Plants form a long tap-root some time before forming a shoot. Germination of fresh seed usually takes place in 3 - 4 months at 25°c[7]. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first two winters. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Consider giving them some protection from the cold for at least their first winter outdoors.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Sabal minor. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in most fertile moist but well-drained soils in a sheltered sunny position[6][8][9]. Although it prefers a humid atmosphere, this species is tolerant of arid atmospheres so long as it has plenty of moisture available at the roots[9].

This palm tolerates short-lived freezes down to about -10°c and can be grown outdoors in the very mildest areas of the country[9]. Palms usually have deep penetrating root systems and generally establish best when planted out at a young stage. However, older plants are substantially more cold tolerant than juvenile plants[9]. In areas at the limit of their cold tolerance, therefore, it is prudent to grow the plants in containers for some years, giving them winter protection, and only planting them into their permanent positions when sheer size dictates[9]. This species can also be transplanted even when very large. Although the thick fleshy roots are easily damaged and/or desiccated, new roots are generally freely produced. It is important to stake the plant very firmly to prevent rock, and also to give it plenty of water until re-established - removing many of the leaves can also help[9].

Of prolific growth and vigour in its native environment, this species has proved to be difficult to establish and slow to grow in cultivation[9]. Small plants are especially slow to get away and are best container-grown until of a god size[9].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Sabal minor. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Sabal minor.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Sabal minor
Genus
Sabal
Family
Palmae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
8
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
  • Maritime exposure
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
3 x 2 meters
Fertility
?
Pollinators
?
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Elias. T. The Complete Trees of N. America. Field Guide and Natural History. Van Nostrand Reinhold Co. ISBN 0442238622 (1980-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.5 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.64.7 Hill. A. F. Economic Botany. The Maple Press (1952-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.55.65.75.8 Sargent. C. S. Manual of the Trees of N. America. Dover Publications Inc. New York. ISBN 0-486-20278-X (1965-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
  7. ? Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 3. Thompson and Morgan. (1989-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.1 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.19.29.39.49.59.69.7 McMillan-Browse. P. Palms for Cooler Climates. Trebah Enterprises. ISBN 0 9521952 0 8 (1993-00-00)
  10. ? Diggs, Jnr. G.M.; Lipscomb. B. L. & O'Kennon. R. J [Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas] Botanical Research Institute, Texas. (1999-00-00)