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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

The young succulent leaves and shoots are eaten raw or cooked like spinach[1][2][3][4][5][6]. A slightly bitter taste, we find them unpleasant on their own though they can be used as a small part of a mixed salad[K]. They can be made into a sauerkraut[7].

Stems - cooked and eaten like asparagus[6].

Root - raw or cooked[8][6][7]. It was fermented before being eaten by the N. American Indians[5].

Leaves

Material uses

Plants can be grown as a ground cover when planted about 30cm apart each way[9]. The dried root smells strongly of roses. They may be used to distil rose-water[10].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Though little known as a medicinal plant, rose root has been used in traditional European medicine for over three thousand years, mainly as a tonic. Modern research has shown that it increases the body's resistance to any type of stress by regulating the body's hormonal response. Its use has been shown to have a protective effect upon the neurotransmitters such as serotonin and dopamine in the brain. It improves neurotransmitter activity by inhibiting their enzymatic destruction and preventing their decline caused by excessive stress hormone release. Rose root also enhances the transport of serotonin's precursors into the brain and studies have shown that use of this herb can increase brain serotonin by up to 30%[11].

The root is adaptogen. It has an enhancing effect upon physical endurance and sexual potency.

A decoction of the flowers has been used to treat stomach aches and intestinal discomfort[7]. The raw flowers have been eaten in the treatment of tuberculosis[7].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Ground cover

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - surface sow in a sunny position in a greenhouse in spring. Do not let the compost dry out. The seed usually germinates in 2 - 4 weeks at 10°c. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in early summer of the following year.

Division in August to October[12]. Very easy, larger divisions can be planted out direct into their permanent positions. We have found that it is better to pot up the smaller divisions and grow them on in light shade in a cold frame until they are well established before planting them out in late spring or early summer.

Cuttings taken in the growing season[12]. Basal shoots in early summer are easiest. Harvest the shoots with plenty of underground stem when they are about 8 - 10cm above the ground. Pot them up into individual pots and keep them in light shade in a cold frame or greenhouse until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the summer.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Rhodiola rosea. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a fertile well drained open loam in a sunny position[13][12]. Tolerates fairly damp conditions but prefers a raised well-drained spot[13]. Established plants are drought resistant[14].

This species is extremely polymorphic[12]. Plants often self-sows when they are growing in a suitable position[13]. They can self-sow to the point of nuisance[K]. The dried root has a rose scent[15][13].

Dioecious. Male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Rhodiola rosea. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Rhodiola rosea.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Rhodiola rosea
Genus
Rhodiola
Family
Crassulaceae
Imported References
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
1
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Drought
  • Strong wind
  • Maritime exposure
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Larkcom. J. Salads all the Year Round. Hamlyn (1980-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.1 Elias. T. and Dykeman. P. A Field Guide to N. American Edible Wild Plants. Van Nostrand Reinhold ISBN 0442222009 (1982-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.1 Harrington. H. D. Edible Native Plants of the Rocky Mountains. University of New Mexico Press ISBN 0-8623-0343-9 (1967-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.2 Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
  6. ? 6.06.16.26.3 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.5 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.1 Coon. N. The Dictionary of Useful Plants. Rodale Press ISBN 0-87857-090-x (1975-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.1 Thomas. G. S. Plants for Ground Cover J. M. Dent & Sons ISBN 0-460-12609-1 (1990-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.1 Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.1 Solgar Vitamins Solgar New Product Information - Rhodiola Vegicaps. Solgar Vitamins, Tring, Herts. (1998-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.112.212.312.4 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.113.213.3 Evans. R. L. Handbook of Cultivated Sedums. Science Reviews (1983-00-00)
  14. ? Chatto. B. The Dry Garden. Dent ISBN 0460045512 (1982-00-00)
  15. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  16. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)