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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Immature seedpods - raw or cooked[1][2][3][4][5]. Best harvested when the seeds are under-developed, the young swollen and succulent seedpods have a delicious sweet flavour that is just like a juicier form of garden peas[K].

Immature seeds - raw or cooked. Sweet and delicious, they can be added to salads, or lightly cooked[K]. A nutritional analysis is available[6]. The mature seeds are rich in protein and can be cooked as a vegetable or added to soups etc[7]. They can also be sprouted and added to salads, soups etc[7]. The mature seed can also be dried and ground into a powder, then used to enrich the protein content of flour when making bread etc[K]. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute[7].

Leaves and young shoots - cooked and used as a potherb[8][7]. The young shoots taste like fresh peas, they are exceptionally tender and can be used in salads[9].
There are no edible uses listed for Pisum sativum macrocarpon.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Pisum sativum macrocarpon.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The seed is contraceptive, fungistatic and spermacidal[6]. The dried and powdered seed has been used as a poultice on the skin where it has an appreciable affect on many types of skin complaint including acne[10]. The oil from the seed, given once a month to women, has shown promise of preventing pregnancy by interfering with the working of progesterone[6]. The oil inhibits endometrial development[11]. In trials, the oil reduced pregnancy rate in women by 60% in a 2 year period and 50% reduction in male sperm count was achieved[11].
There are no medicinal uses listed for Pisum sativum macrocarpon.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Pre-soak the seed for 24 hours in warm water and then sow in situ in succession from early spring until early summer. A minimum temperature of 10°c is required for germination, which should take place in about 7 - 10 days. If you want to grow the peas to maturity then the seed needs to be sown by the middle of spring. You may need to protect the seed from the ravages of mice.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Pisum sativum macrocarpon. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a well-drained moisture retentive soil[1][4][12]. Prefers a calcareous soil[12]. Prefers a pH in the range 6 to 7.5[13]. Prefers a rich loamy soil[1]. A light soil and a sheltered position is best for early sowings[1].

The sugar pea has a swollen, fibre-free and very sweet seedpod which is eaten whole when immature. There are several named varieties. This form is harder to grow for its mature seed, especially in damp climates, because the pod no longer has a cellulose membrane to protect the seed from damp and so the seed has a greater tendency to rot in wet weather. Peas are good growing companions for radishes, carrots, cucumbers, sweet corn, beans and turnips[14][15][16]. They are inhibited by alliums, gladiolus, fennel and strawberries growing nearby[14][15][16]. There is some evidence that if Chinese mustard (Brassica juncea) is grown as a green manure before sowing peas this will reduce the incidence of soil-borne root rots[9].

This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[13]. When removing plant remains at the end of the growing season, it is best to only remove the aerial parts of the plant, leaving the roots in the ground to decay and release their nitrogen.

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Pisum sativum macrocarpon. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Pisum sativum macrocarpon.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Pisum sativum macrocarpon
Genus
Pisum
Family
Leguminosae
Imported References
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    2 x meters
    Fertility
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Simons. New Vegetable Growers Handbook. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-050-0 (1977-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.4 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Larkcom J. Oriental Vegetables John Murray ISBN 0-7195-4781-4 (1991-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.111.2 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.1 Thompson. B. The Gardener's Assistant. Blackie and Son. (1878-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.113.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.1 Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants. Watkins (1979-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.1 Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening. Garden Way, Vermont, USA. ISBN 0-88266-064-0 (1978-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.1 Allardice.P. A - Z of Companion Planting. Cassell Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-304-34324-2 (1993-00-00)