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Uses

Toxic parts

The seed and green parts of the plant contain an insecticide (probably rotenone) and might be poisonous to people[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Root - raw or cooked[2]. Thirst quenching and nutritious with an easily digested starch[1]. The root is slow to discolour and remains crisp after slicing so it is often used in green and in fruit salads[1]. Young seed pods - cooked and used like French beans[3][4][5]. The pods must be thoroughly cooked in order to remove the toxic principle rotenone[6]. It is thought that some varieties might be free of rotenone and their mature seeds could therefore be used as a protein crop[1].

Seedpod

Material uses

The plant contains rotenone, the active ingredient in the insecticide 'derris', and it has the potential to be used as an insecticide[6]. Derris is a relatively safe insecticide in that it does not affect warm-blooded animals and also breaks down into harmless substances with 24 hours of being used. It does, however, kill some beneficial insects and is also toxic to fish and amphibians[K].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Pachyrhizus ahipa.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Pre-soak the seed for 12 hours in warm water and then sow in early spring in a warm greenhouse. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. As soon as they are large enough to handle, prick out the seedlings into individual pots of rich soil and grow them on fast. Plant them out after the last expected frosts. Give the plants some protection, such as a cloche, until they are growing away well.

Division of the root tubers in the autumn. Store the roots in a cool but frost-free place over the winter, planting them into pots in the greenhouse in early spring and planting them out after the last expected frosts. Give the plants some protection, such as a cloche, until they are growing away well.

Cuttings.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Pachyrhizus ahipa. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a light rich well-drained sandy soil[1].

Sometimes cultivated for its edible root in the Andes[1], this plant is not frost hardy but could possibly be grown as a summer crop in cool temperate zones. There are some named varieties[1]. When grown for its root the flowers should be removed, this is thought to increase the size of roots by up to 100%[1]. The plant is day-neutral and so is much more likely to produce tubers in this country than the related jicama, Pachyrrizus tuberosus[1]. It has produced good yields when grown in a greenhouse in Denmark[1]. A faster-maturing plant than the jicama, it flowers in about 10 weeks from seed and the root is harvested after 5 - 6 months[1].

This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[6].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Pachyrhizus ahipa. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Pachyrhizus ahipa.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Pachyrhizus ahipa
Genus
Pachyrhizus
Family
Leguminosae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type












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