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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Seed - raw or cooked. Normally used as a flavouring on bread, cakes, curries, pickles etc[1][2][3][4][5]. There is a belief that eating the seed will make a woman's breasts plumper[6]. The seed is a very popular spice from the Mediterranean to India. It has a pungent flavour according to one report[7] whilst another says that it has a spicy fruity taste[8] and a third that the scent is somewhat like nutmeg[6]. The immature seed is bitter, but when fully ripe it is aromatic[2]. It is also used as a pepper substitute[1].

Unknown part

Material uses

The aromatic seed contains about 1.5% essential oil[9]. It is placed amongst clothes etc to repel moths[1]. The seeds can also be put in muslin bags and hung near a fire when they will fill the room with their delicious scent[6]. They need to be changed about every three weeks[6]. The seed contains 35% of a fatty oil[3][9].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Like many aromatic culinary herbs, the seeds of black cumin are beneficial for the digestive system, soothing stomach pains and spasms and easing wind, bloating and colic[10]. The ripe seed is anthelmintic, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, diuretic, emmenagogue, galactogogue, laxative and stimulant[1][2][7][8][9]. An infusion is used in the treatment of digestive and menstrual disorders, insufficient lactation and bronchial complaints[2][8]. The seeds are much used in India to increase the flow of milk in nursing mothers and they can also be used to treat intestinal worms, especially in children[10]. Externally, the seed is ground into a powder, mixed with sesame oil and used to treat abscesses, haemorrhoids and orchitis[8][9]. The powdered seed has been used to remove lice from the hair[6].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring or early autumn in situ[11]. The autumn sowing might not be successful in harsh winters. Plants can be transplanted if necessary[12].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Nigella sativa. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Easily grown in any good garden soil, preferring a sunny position[11][13]. Prefers a light soil in a warm position[14].

This species is often cultivated, especially in western Asia and India, for its edible seed[15]. The seed is aromatic with a nutmeg scent[6].

A greedy plant, inhibiting the growth of nearby plants, especially legumes[16].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Nigella sativa. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Nigella sativa.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Nigella sativa
Genus
Nigella
Family
Ranunculaceae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    "image:Nigella sativa.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Nigella sativa.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Nigella sativa.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


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    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.41.51.6 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.4 Komarov. V. L. Flora of the USSR. Israel Program for Scientific Translation (1968-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Polunin. O. Flowers of Europe - A Field Guide. Oxford University Press ISBN 0192176218 (1969-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.46.56.66.76.8 Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.5 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.29.39.49.5 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    12. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    13. ? International Bee Research Association. Garden Plants Valuable to Bees. International Bee Research Association. (1981-00-00)
    14. ? Thompson. B. The Gardener's Assistant. Blackie and Son. (1878-00-00)
    15. ? Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    16. ? Hatfield. A. W. How to Enjoy your Weeds. Frederick Muller Ltd ISBN 0-584-10141-4 (1977-00-00)
    17. ? Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named PFAFimport-50

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