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Uses

Toxic parts

Although no mention of toxicity has been seen for this species, it belongs to a family that contains many species of poisonous plants so some caution is advised. It is normally the leaves and the unripe fruits that are most likely to be suspect, this family also includes many food plants such as potatoes, tomatoes, peppers etc.

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit[1]. No more details are given. The fruit is a berry about 15mm in diameter[2]. Young leaves - boiled[1]. Some caution is advised, see the notes above on toxicity.

Fruit

Leaves

Material uses

The plant is thought to repel flies[3].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The plant is diuretic[4]. There is no evidence to suggest that the plant is purgative, though an alkaloid with mydriatic action is present[4]. The seeds are used in Tibetan medicine, they are said to have an acrid taste and a cooling, very poisonous potency[5]. Analgesic, anthelmintic, antibacterial, anti-inflammatory and febrifuge, regular use increases bodily vigour[5]. They are used in the treatment of contagious disorders, toothache, intestinal pain from worms and impotence[5]. A decoction of the seeds is used in the treatment of fevers[6].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow in situ in late spring, preferably after the last expected frosts[2]. Young seedlings can be transplanted. The seed can remain dormant for several decades[2].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Nicandra physaloides. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in ordinary garden soil[7], but prefers a rich well-drained soil in a sunny position[2].

Plants withstand poor weather conditions well and do not usually require staking[2]. Plants are fast-growing[3] and often self-sow freely[2].

Individual flowers only live for one day, but the plant produces a succession of flowers from summer to early autumn[3].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Nicandra physaloides. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Nicandra physaloides.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Nicandra physaloides
Genus
Nicandra
Family
Solanaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
8
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.52.62.7 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.3 Tsarong. Tsewang. J. Tibetan Medicinal Plants Tibetan Medical Publications, India ISBN 81-900489-0-2 (1994-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (2002-00-00)
    7. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)

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