This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

Uses

Toxic parts

Although no reports of toxicity have been seen for this species, there is a report for some members of this genus that some of the constituents of the wax might be carcinogenic[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw or cooked[2]. Sweet with a pleasant blend of acid, they are very pleasant eating[3]. About 13mm in diameter[4]. The fruit contains about 12.6% sugar, 1% protein, 0.4% ash[4]. Low in vitamin C, about 4.1mg per 100ml[4]. The fruit does not keep well, only lasting in good condition for 2 - 3 days after picking[4]. Yields from mature trees can be as high as 25kg per year, but are more often around 15.5kg[4].

Fruit

Material uses

A wax covering on the fruit is extracted by scalding the fruit with boiling water and immersing them for a few minutes, the wax floats to the surface and is then skimmed off. The fruit is then boiled in water to extract the wax from the pulp and once more the wax is skimmed off. It is then strained through a muslin cloth and can be used to make aromatic candles. Candles made from this wax are quite brittle but are less greasy in warm weather[5]. They are slightly aromatic and do not smoke when put out, making them much more pleasant to use that wax or tallow candles[5]. The wax is also used in making soaps[5].

A yellow dye is obtained from the bark[6][7]. The plant is a source of tannin[6]. (Probably the bark or the leaves[K].) The bark is said to contain 60 - 80% tannin[7].

Wood - hard, close-grained. a good fuel[8]. Used mainly for fuel, though it is sometimes used for making poles for construction[7].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The bark is antirheumatic, antiseptic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, ophthalmic and stimulant[6][8][4][9][7]. It has proved useful in the treatment of fevers, asthma and coughs[9]. The juice is applied to treat rheumatism[7]. Mixed with ginger, it is used as a rubefacient in the treatment of cholera[9].

The juice of the bark is taken internally in the treatment of catarrh and headaches, and is applied externally to cuts and wounds[7]. A decoction of the bark is used in the treatment of fevers, asthma and diarrhoea[7]. This decoction is boiled to form a gelatinous mass that is applied as a poultice on sprains[7]. Combined with the bark of Quercus lanata, it is used as a decoction in the treatmnt of dysentery[7].

The juice of the unripe fruit is used as an anthelmintic[7].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in the autumn in a cold frame. Barely cover the seed and keep it moist. Stored seed germinates more freely if given a 3 month cold stratification and then sown in a cold frame. Germination is usually good[10]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on in the cold frame for the first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer[K].

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 8cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Pot up and overwinter in a cold frame. Fair to good percentage[10]. Cuttings of mature wood in November/December in a frame. Layering in spring[11].

Division of suckers in the dormant season. Plant them out direct into their permanent positions.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Myrica nagi. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moist soil. Grows well in an open position in a well-drained soil in sun or light shade[11]. Thrives in any ordinary garden soil. Prefers a lime-free loamy or peaty soil[12].

We are not sure how hardy this plant will be in Britain, it is unlikely to succeed outside the very mildest areas of the country. There is also some confusion between this species and M. rubra, it is possible that they are the same. The fruit is sold in local markets in the Himalayas[4]. It ripens over a fairly long period, so is not suitable for commercial cultivation[4]. Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[11]. Dioecious, male and female plants must be grown if seed is required.

Many species in this genus have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil micro-organisms, these form nodules on the roots of the plants and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[11].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Myrica nagi. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Myrica nagi.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Myrica nagi
Genus
Myrica
Family
Myricaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.1 Low. T. Wild Food Plants of Australia. Angus and Robertson. ISBN 0-207-14383-8 (1989-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.64.74.84.9 Parmar. C. and Kaushal. M.K. Wild Fruits of the Sub-Himalayan Region. Kalyani Publishers. New Delhi. (1982-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.3 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Gamble. J. S. A Manual of Indian Timbers. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh (1972-00-00)
  7. ? 7.007.017.027.037.047.057.067.077.087.097.107.11 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (2002-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.4 Gupta. B. L. Forest Flora of Chakrata, Dehra Dun and Saharanpur. Forest Research Institute Press (1945-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.19.29.3 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.211.3 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  12. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  13. ? [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)


Facts about "Myrica nagi"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyMyricaceae +
Belongs to genusMyrica +
Functions asNitrogen fixer +
Has binomial nameMyrica nagi +
Has common nameBox Myrtle +
Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
Has edible partFruit +
Has edible useUnknown use +
Has environmental toleranceHigh wind +
Has fertility typeSelf sterile + and Wind +
Has flowers of typeDioecious +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useDye +, Tannin +, Wax + and Wood +
Has mature height12 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAntirheumatic +, Antiseptic +, Aromatic +, Astringent +, Carminative +, Febrifuge +, Ophthalmic +, Rubefacient +, Stimulant + and Anthelmintic +
Has search namemyrica nagi + and box myrtle +
Has shade toleranceLight shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid + and Neutral +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy + and Clay +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameMyrica nagi +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Is deciduous or evergreenEvergreen +
Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Tolerates windYes +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi +, Myrica nagi + and Myrica nagi +