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Uses

Toxic parts

The plant contains several glycosides and is possibly toxic[1].

Edible uses

Notes

The whole plant can be cooked[2]. It is tasteless if eaten raw, but has a taste like asparagus when it is cooked[3].

Leaves

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Monotropa uniflora.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

An infusion of the root is antispasmodic, hypnotic, nervine, sedative, tonic[4][5][1]. It is a good remedy for spasms, fainting spells and various nervous conditions[6]. It has been given to children who suffer from fits, epilepsy and convulsions[7].

The plant was used by some native North American Indian tribes to treat eye problems, the stem was bruised and the clear fluid of the stems applied to the eyes[8][7]. The juice from the stems has also been used to treat nervous irritability, including fits and spasms[5]. It has been suggested in the past as a possible opium substitute[5]. An infusion of the leaves has been used to treat colds and fevers[7]. The crushed plant has been rubbed on bunions and warts in order to destroy them[7]. A poultice of the plant has been applied to sores that are difficult to heal[7]. The flowers have been chewed in order to bring relief from toothache[7].

Water extracts of the plant are bactericidal[1].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

This is going to be an exceedingly difficult plant to propagate. The seed will need to be sown close to its host plant so one way would be to sow it in the leaf litter under established beech or coniferous trees[9]. Alternatively, you could try sowing the seed in a cold frame in a pot that already contains a potential host plant. If successful, grow the young plant on in the cold frame for a couple of years before planting it out close to an established beech or coniferous tree.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Monotropa uniflora. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

We have very little information on this plant but it should be hardy in this country. It is likely to require shady woodland conditions in a humus-rich moist soil, It is a saprophytic plant, quite devoid of chlorophyll and depending totally on its host plant for nutrient[9].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Monotropa uniflora. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Monotropa uniflora.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Monotropa uniflora
Genus
Monotropa
Family
Pyrolaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
partial sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    "image:Red indian pipes.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Red indian pipes.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Red indian pipes.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


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    "image:Red indian pipes.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.3 Emboden. W. Narcotic Plants Studio Vista ISBN 0-289-70864-8 (1979-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Coffey. T. The History and Folklore of North American Wild Flowers. Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-2624-6 (1993-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.6 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    10. ? Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)
    11. ? Britton. N. L. Brown. A. An Illustrated Flora of the Northern United States and Canada Dover Publications. New York. ISBN 0-486-22642-5 (1970-00-00)

    "image:Red indian pipes.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    Facts about "Monotropa uniflora"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyPyrolaceae +
    Belongs to genusMonotropa +
    Has binomial nameMonotropa uniflora +
    Has common nameIndian Pipe +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partLeaves +
    Has edible useUnknown use +
    Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
    Has imageRed indian pipes.JPG +
    Has lifecycle typePerennial +
    Has mature height1.5 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useAntibacterial +, Antispasmodic +, Febrifuge +, Hypnotic +, Nervine +, Odontalgic +, Ophthalmic +, Sedative +, Tonic + and Warts +
    Has primary imageRed indian pipes.JPG +
    Has search namemonotropa uniflora + and indian pipe +
    Has shade tolerancePermanent shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy + and Clay +
    Has sun preferencePartial sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameMonotropa uniflora +
    Has water requirementsmoderate +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedYes +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
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