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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw or cooked. We have seen no reports of edibility for this species, but it is certainly not poisonous. The fruit is likely to have an acid flavour and be suitable for making jams. jellies etc. The fruit is about 10mm in diameter[1].

Fruit

Material uses

A yellow dye is obtained from the inner bark of the stem and roots[2][3]. It is green[4].

Dark green, violet and dark blue-purple dyes are obtained from the fruit[4]. A green dye is obtained from the leaves[4].

This species forms suckers freely and should make a good dense ground cover in a sunny position[5].

Unknown part

Dye

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

A decoction of the roots is used as a blood tonic and as a treatment for coughs[3]. Berberine, universally present in rhizomes of Mahonia species, has marked antibacterial effects[6] and is used as a bitter tonic[7]. Since it is not appreciably absorbed by the body, it is used orally in the treatment of various enteric infections, especially bacterial dysentery[6]. It should not be used with Glycyrrhiza species (Liquorice) because this nullifies the effects of the berberine[6]. Berberine has also shown antitumour activity[6]. The root and root bark are best harvested in the autumn[7].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Ground cover

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame[8]. It usually germinates in the spring[K]. 'Green' seed (harvested when the embryo has fully developed but before the seed case has dried) should be sown as soon as it is harvested and germinates within 6 weeks[K]. Stored seed should be sown as soon as possible in late winter or spring. 3 weeks cold stratification will improve its germination, which should take place in 3 - 6 months at 10°c. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a cold frame for at least their first winter. Plant them out in late spring or early summer.

Division of suckers in spring[8]. Whilst they can be placed direct into their permanent positions, better results are achieved if they are potted up and placed in a frame until established[5].

Leaf cuttings in the autumn.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Mahonia pumila. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it thrives in any good well-drained garden soil[5], preferring one on the dryish side. Prefers a sunny position[5], but also succeeds in the light shade of trees[K].

This species is hardy to about -15°c if growing in a sheltered position[9]. Established plants sucker freely and form quite dense thickets[1].

Resistant to honey fungus[10].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Mahonia pumila. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Mahonia pumila.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Mahonia pumila
Genus
Mahonia
Family
Berberidaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Drought
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Arnberger. L. P. Flowers of the Southwest Mountains. Southwestern Monuments Ass. (1968-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Grae. I. Nature's Colors - Dyes from Plants. MacMillan Publishing Co. New York. ISBN 0-02-544950-8 (1974-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.5 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.17.2 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
  9. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Shrubs. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30258-2 (1989-00-00)
  10. ? RHS. The Garden. Volume 112. Royal Horticultural Society (1987-00-00)
  11. ? [Flora of N. America] ()