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Uses

Toxic parts

Some caution should be exercised with this species, particularly with regard to its edible leaves, since it belongs to a family that often contains toxins. However, use of the leaves is well documented and fairly widespread in some areas.

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw, cooked in soups etc or dried for later use[1][2][3]. Sweet with an aniseed-like flavour[3]. The fruit is an oblong berry about 15mm long by 8mm wid[4]. Only the fully ripe fruits should be eaten[K].

Leaves and young shoots - raw or cooked[5][1][2]. A peppermint-like flavour, the leaves are used in salads or used as a potherb[3]. Rich in vitamin A., the leaves also contain about 3.9% protein, 2.25% carbohydrate, 0.7% fat, 1.4% ash[6]. The roasted seed is a coffee substitute[3].

The dried leaves are a tea substitute[3].

Unknown part

Fruit

Leaves

Material uses

Can be grown as an informal hedge, succeeding in maritime exposure[7]. Plants have an extensive root system and can be planted to stabilize banks[7].
There are no material uses listed for Lycium chinense.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Chinese boxthorn is a major Chinese tonic herb with a history of almost 2,000 years of medicinal use[8]. Both the berries and the root are used and traditionally the plant is believed to promote long life[8].

The fruit is one of the most popular tonics used in Chinese herbal medicine[9][10]. A decoction is used to clear the vision, strengthen the kidneys, restore semen and nourish the liver[11]. The fruit protects the liver from damage caused by exposure to toxins[8]. It is also used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, vertigo, nocturnal emissions and aching back and legs[9]. The fruit of many members of this genus is a very rich source of vitamins and minerals, especially in vitamins A, C and E, flavanoids and other bio-active compounds. It is also a fairly good source of essential fatty acids, which is fairly unusual for a fruit. It is being investigated as a food that is capable of reducing the incidence of cancer and also as a means of halting or reversing the growth of cancers[12]. The seed is used as a haemostat for the control of bleeding, with a special action on the kidneys and sex organs[10]. The root bark is antibacterial, antipyretic, hepatic, hypoglycaemic and vasodilator[9]. It stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system, which controls involuntary bodily functions such as digestive secretions[8]. The root is used in the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis and pneumonia in small children[11], chronic febrile disease, night sweats, cough and asthma, tuberculosis, hypertension and diabetes mellitus[9]. The root can be harvested at any time of the year but traditionally it is harvested in the spring and can be dried for later use[8]. The root bark contains betaine. This can increase the rate of growth of farm animals and increase the weight and amount of eggs, it is used in the treatment of achlorhydria, atherosclerosis and hepatic diseases[9].

Haemostatic[1].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Hedge


Earth stabiliser

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow early spring in a greenhouse. Germination is usually good and fairly quick. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Pinch out the shoot tips of the young plants in order to encourage bushy growth[13].

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 5 - 10cm with a heel if possible, July/August in individual pots in a frame. Good percentage[13]. Cuttings of mature wood of the current season's growth, autumn to late winter in a cold frame. High percentage[13][7]. Division of suckers in late winter. Very easy, the suckers can be planted out direct into their permanent positions.

Layering.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Lycium chinense. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it does not require a rich soil, flowering and fruiting better in a well-drained soil of moderate quality[14][15][7]. Succeeds in impoverished soils[7]. Requires a sunny position[7]. Tolerates maritime exposure[7].

A very hardy plant, tolerating temperatures down to about -23°c[7]. This species is widely cultivated for its edible young shoots in China.

There is much confusion between this species and the closely related L. barbarum. Most, if not all, of the plants being grown as L. chinense in Britain are in fact L.barbarum[15][16][7].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Lycium chinense. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Lycium chinense.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Lycium chinense
Genus
Lycium
Family
Solanaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
  • Maritime exposure
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type

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"image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


"image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki."image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki."image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






References

  1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 Kariyone. T. Atlas of Medicinal Plants. ()
  2. ? 2.02.12.2 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.5 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.1 [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre (1977-00-00)
  7. ? 7.007.017.027.037.047.057.067.077.087.097.10 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.5 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.19.29.39.49.5 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.110.2 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.2 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
  12. ? 12.012.1 Matthews. V. The New Plantsman. Volume 1, 1994. Royal Horticultural Society ISBN 1352-4186 (1994-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.113.2 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
  14. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  15. ? 15.015.115.2 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
  16. ? ? Flora Europaea Cambridge University Press (1964-00-00)
  17. ? Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)

"image:Lycium chinense 13.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

Facts about "Lycium chinense"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familySolanaceae +
Belongs to genusLycium +
Functions asHedge + and Earth stabiliser +
Has binomial nameLycium chinense +
Has common nameChinese Boxthorn +
Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
Has edible partUnknown part +, Fruit + and Leaves +
Has edible useCoffee +, Unknown use + and Tea +
Has environmental toleranceMaritime exposure + and High wind +
Has fertility typeBees +
Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
Has growth rateModerate +
Has hardiness zone6 +
Has imageLycium chinense 13.JPG +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has mature height2.5 +
Has mature width2 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAntibacterial +, Antipyretic +, Cancer +, Haemostatic +, Hepatic +, Hypoglycaemic +, Infertility +, Kidney +, Ophthalmic +, Tonic + and Vasodilator +
Has primary imageLycium chinense 13.JPG +
Has search namelycium chinense + and chinese boxthorn +
Has shade toleranceNo shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy + and Clay +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameLycium chinense +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Is deciduous or evergreenDeciduous +
Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
Tolerates maritime exposureYes +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Tolerates windYes +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense +, Lycium chinense + and Lycium chinense +