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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Seed - cooked. The seed can be ground into a flour and used as a cereal in making bread, porridge etc[1][2][3][4].

Malt is obtained by sprouting and roasting the seed, then boiling the seed. The resulting liquid is a sweet substance that is used in making beer and as a food[2][4]. The longer the seed is roasted, the darker this liquid will be.

The roasted (unsprouted) seed is used as a coffee and a salt substitute[4].

Unknown part

Material uses

The stems, after the seed has been harvested, have many uses. They are a source of fibres for making paper, a biomass for fuel etc, they can be shredded and used as a mulch[5][6].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Barley grain is an excellent food for convalescence, either in the form of porridge or as a decoction of the seed. It is soothing to the throat and provides easily assimilated nutrients[2][7]. It can also be taken to clear catarrh. Its demulcent properties soothes inflammation of the gut and urinary tract[7]. It is commonly given to children suffering minor infections or diarrhoea and is particularly recommended as a treatment for feverish states and in catarrhal affections of the respiratory and urinary organs[2][7]. Made into a poultice, the seed is an effective remedy for soothing and reducing inflammation in sores and swellings[7]. Modern research has shown that barley may be of aid in the treatment of hepatitis, whilst other trials have shown that it may help to control diabetes[7]. Barley bran may have the effect of lowering blood cholesterol levels and preventing bowel cancer[7].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow in situ in March or October and only just cover the seed. Make sure the soil surface does not dry out if the weather is dry. Germination takes place within 2 weeks.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Hordeum distichon. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in most soils and in climates ranging from sub-arctic to sub-tropical[1][6]. Easily grown in light soils[8]. Widely cultivated in temperate zones, especially in cooler or moister areas, for its edible seed[1][9][6]. There are many named varieties. This species is sometimes considered to be no more than a sub-species of H. vulgare[10].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Hordeum distichon. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Hordeum distichon.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Hordeum distichon
Genus
Hordeum
Family
Gramineae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Harrison. S. Wallis. M. Masefield. G. The Oxford Book of Food Plants. Oxford University Press (1975-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Carruthers. S. P. (Editor) Alternative Enterprises for Agriculture in the UK. Centre for Agricultural Strategy, Univ. of Reading ISBN 0704909820 (1986-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.3 Hill. A. F. Economic Botany. The Maple Press (1952-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.6 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    8. ? Grounds. R. Ornamental Grasses. Christopher Helm ISBN 0-7470-1219-9 (1989-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 ? Flora Europaea Cambridge University Press (1964-00-00)
    10. ? Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)

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