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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

The fresh calyx (the outer whorl of the flower) is eaten raw in salads, is cooked and used as a flavouring in cakes etc and is also used in making jellies, soups, sauces, pickles, puddings etc[1][2][3][4]. The calyx is rich in citric acid and pectin and so is useful for making jams, jellies etc[5][4]. It is also used to add a red colour and to flavour to herb teas[6][4], and can be roasted and used as a coffee substitute[3].

A refreshing and very popular beverage can be made by boiling the calyx, sweetening it with sugar and adding ginger[3]. Tender young leaves and stems - raw or cooked[7][4][8]. Used in salads, as a potherb and as a seasoning in curries, they have an acid, rhubarb-like flavour[3][6][4]. Seed - roasted and ground into a powder then used in oily soups and sauces[7][3]. The roasted seeds have been used as a coffee substitute that is said to have aphrodisiac properties[4]. Root - it is edible but very fibrousy[9]. Mucilaginous, without very much flavour[9].

The seed yields 20% oil[1]. (This is probably edible[K]).

Unknown part

Flowers

Leaves

Material uses

A strong fibre obtained from the stem (called rosella hemp) is used for various household purposes including making sackcloth, twine and cord[1][2][6][8].

A yellow dye is obtained from the petals[5]. It is used in medicines etc[1].

The seed yields 20% oil[1].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Roselle is an aromatic, astringent, cooling herb that is much used in the Tropics. It is said to have diuretic effects, to help lower fevers and is antiscorbutic[1][6].

The leaves are antiscorbutic, emollient, diuretic, refrigerant, and sedative[4]. The leaves are very mucilaginous and are used as an emollient and as a soothing cough remedy. They are used externally as a poultice on abscesses[4]. The fruits are antiscorbutic[4]. The flowers contain gossypetin, anthocyanin, and the glycoside hibiscin[4]. These may have diuretic and choleretic effects, decreasing the viscosity of the blood, reducing blood pressure and stimulating intestinal peristalsis[4]. The leaves and flowers are used internally as a tonic tea for digestive and kidney functions[1][6]. Experimentally, an infusion decreases the viscosity of the blood, reduces blood pressure and stimulates intestinal peristalsis[5]. The ripe calyces are diuretic and antiscorbutic[4]. The succulent calyx, boiled in water, is used as a drink in the treatment of bilious attacks[4]. The seeds are diuretic, laxative and tonic[4]. They are used in the treatment of debility[4]. The bitter root is aperitif and tonic[4]. The plant is also reported to be antiseptic, aphrodisiac, astringent, cholagogue, demulcent, digestive, purgative and resolvent[4]. It is used as a folk remedy in the treatment of abscesses, bilious conditions, cancer, cough, debility, dyspepsia, dysuria, fever, hangover, heart ailments, hypertension, neurosis, scurvy, and strangury[4]. One report says that the plant has been shown to be of value in the treatment of arteriosclerosis and as an intestinal antiseptic, though it does not say which part of the plant is used[4].

Simulated ingestion of the plant extract decreased the rate of absorption of alcohol, lessening the intensity of alcohol effects in chickens[4].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow early spring in a warm greenhouse. Germination is usually fairly rapid. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. If growing them as annuals, plant them out into their permanent positions in early summer and protect them with a frame or cloche until they are growing away well. If hoping to grow them as perennials, then it is better to grow them on in the greenhouse for their first year and to plant them out in early summer of the following year. Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame. Overwinter them in a warm greenhouse and plant out after the last expected frosts.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Hibiscus sabdariffa. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a well-drained humus rich fertile soil in full sun[10]. Roselle requires a permeable soil, a friable sandy loam with humus being preferable; however, it will adapt to a variety of soils[4]. It is not shade tolerant and must be kept weed-free[4]. It will tolerate floods, heavy winds or stagnant water[4]. Roselle is reported to tolerate an annual precipitation of 64 to 429cm, an annual temperature in the range of 12.5 to 27.5°C and a pH of 4.5 to 8.0[4].

This species is not hardy in Britain, but it can be grown as a half-hardy annual, flowering in its first year from seed[10]. Plants are sensitive to the length of daylight and do not flower if there are more than 13 hours of light in the day[11]. Roselle is widely cultivated in the Tropical and Sub-tropical zones for its fibre and edible calyx, there are some named varieties[3]. Roselle is best suited to tropical climates with a well-distributed rainfall of 1500 - 2000 mm yearly, from sea-level to about 600 m altitude[4]. It tolerates a warmer and more humid climate than kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus), but is more susceptible to damage from frost and fog[4]. Plants exhibit marked photoperiodism, not flowering at shortening days of 13.5 hours, but flowering at 11 hours. In the United States plants do not flower until short days of late fall or early winter. Since flowering is not necessary for fibre production, long light days for 3 - 4 months is the critical factor[4]. There are two main forms of the plant:- var. sabdariffa has red or pale yellow inflated edible calyces but a poor quality fibre; var. altissima is grown for its fibre but has inedible calyces[4].

Plants have a deep penetrating taproot[4].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Hibiscus sabdariffa. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Hibiscus sabdariffa.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Hibiscus sabdariffa
Genus
Hibiscus
Family
Malvaceae
Imported References
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
10
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    3 x 2 meters
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    "image:Hsabdariffa1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Hsabdariffa1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Hsabdariffa1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Hsabdariffa1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

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    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.41.51.61.71.81.9 Komarov. V. L. Flora of the USSR. Israel Program for Scientific Translation (1968-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.3 Hill. A. F. Economic Botany. The Maple Press (1952-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.53.6 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    4. ? 4.004.014.024.034.044.054.064.074.084.094.104.114.124.134.144.154.164.174.184.194.204.214.224.234.244.254.264.274.284.294.30 Duke. J. Handbook of Energy Crops - (1983-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.5 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.46.56.66.7 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.2 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.3 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (2002-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Cribb. A. B. and J. W. Wild Food in Australia. Fontana ISBN 0-00-634436-4 (1976-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    11. ? Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden. ()
    12. ? [Flora of China] (1994-00-00)

    "image:Hsabdariffa1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    Facts about "Hibiscus sabdariffa"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyMalvaceae +
    Belongs to genusHibiscus +
    Has binomial nameHibiscus sabdariffa +
    Has common nameRoselle +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partUnknown part +, Flowers +, Leaves +, Root + and Seed +
    Has edible useCoffee +, Unknown use +, Oil + and Pectin +
    Has fertility typeInsects +
    Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
    Has hardiness zone10 +
    Has imageHsabdariffa1.jpg +
    Has lifecycle typeAnnual + and Perennial +
    Has material partUnknown part +
    Has material useDye +, Fibre + and Oil +
    Has mature height3 +
    Has mature width2 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useAntiscorbutic +, Astringent +, Diuretic +, Febrifuge + and Stomachic +
    Has primary imageHsabdariffa1.jpg +
    Has search namehibiscus sabdariffa + and roselle +
    Has shade toleranceNo shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy + and Clay +
    Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
    Has sun preferenceFull sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameHibiscus sabdariffa +
    Has water requirementsmoderate +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedYes +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
    Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa +, Hibiscus sabdariffa + and Hibiscus sabdariffa +