This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

Uses

Edible uses

Notes

The juice of the plant is used to curdle plant milks[1][2]. You heat the milk and the leaves together in order to make the milk curdle[3].

Unknown part

Material uses

Substances in the plant are used to curb the growth of bacteria[4].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The sundew has a long history of herbal use, having been popular for its fortifying and aphrodisiac effects[5]. It relaxes the muscles of the respiratory tract, easing breathing and relieving wheezing and so is of great value in the treatment of various chest complaints[6]. The plant has become quite rare and so it should not be harvested from the wild[6].

The flowering plant is antibacterial, antibiotic, antispasmodic, antitussive, demulcent, expectorant and hypoglycaemic[7][3][8][4][9][10][11][12][13][5]. The plant is used with advantage in the treatment of whooping cough, exerting a peculiar action on the respiratory organs[7]. It is also used in the treatment of incipient phthisis, chronic bronchitis and asthma[7]. Externally, it has been used to treat corns, warts and bunions[14].The plant is harvested in the summer and can be dried for later use[3]. Use with caution[9]. Internal use of this herb causes a harmless colouring of the urine[8]. An extract of the plant contains plumbagin, which is antibiotic against a wide range of pathogens[13][5]. Because of their protein digesting enzymes, the leaf juice has been used in the treatment of warts and corns[7][13].

The entire fresh plant, harvested when it is starting to flower, is used to make a homeopathic remedy[15]. It is used mainly in the treatment of coughs[15] and is specific for whooping cough[3].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown thinly as soon as it is ripe into pots of a free-draining soil with some charcoal added and with a layer of finely chopped sphagnum moss on top[16]. Surface sow and keep the compost moist. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 2 months at 20°c[16]. Grow the plants on in the pots for their first growing season, making sure that the soil does not become dry. Divide the plants in the autumn, grow them on in the greenhouse for the winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Drosera rotundifolia. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a sandy peaty soil, succeeding in poor soils and bogs[17][18]. Requires a sunny position[5]. An insectivorous plant, it can survive in nitrogen poor soils because it gets the nutrients it needs from insects[17][3][8][18]. The upper surfaces of leaves are covered with hairs that secrete a sweet sticky substance[3].This attracts insects, which become smeared with it and unable to escape - the plant then exudes a digestive fluid that enables it to absorb most of the insect into its system[3].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Drosera rotundifolia. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Drosera rotundifolia.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Drosera rotundifolia
Genus
Drosera
Family
Droseraceae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
high
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.53.63.73.8 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.4 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.2 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.4 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.3 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
    12. ? 12.012.1 Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
    13. ? 13.013.113.213.3 Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.1 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.115.2 Castro. M. The Complete Homeopathy Handbook. Macmillan. London. ISBN 0-333-55581-3 (1990-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.1 Bird. R. (Editor) Focus on Plants. Volume 5. (formerly 'Growing from seed') Thompson and Morgan. (1991-00-00)
    17. ? 17.017.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    18. ? 18.018.118.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    19. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)

    "image:Drosera-rotundifolia.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.