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Uses

Toxic parts

Bermuda grass is reported to be photosensitizing in animals[1]. Under certain environmental conditions the plant can produce hydrocyanic acid and so is potentially toxic to livestck[2]. The plant is also said to cause contact dermatitis and, with its high production of pollen, can be a major cause of hayfever[1][2].

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Cynodon dactylon.

Material uses

Plants are sometimes grown as a cover for warm sunny banks and are sometimes used for lawns[3][1]. They stay green even in hot and dry weather[1]. Plants give complete ground cover in 4-8 weeks when planted 30-45 cm apart[1]. They succeed on most soil types and requires very little mowing on poor soils[1].

Valuable for soil conservation due to its long runners that root at the nodes[1].

Plants are used to produce biomass. Annual productivity ranges from 4 to 52 tonnes per hectare[1].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Bermudagrass is reported to be alterative, anabolic, antiseptic, aperient, astringent, cyanogenetic, demulcent, depurative, diuretic, emollient, sudorific, and vulnerary[1]. A decoction of the root is used as a diuretic in the treatment of dropsy and secondary syphilis[4]. An infusion of the root is used to stop bleeding from piles[4][5].

The juice of the plant is astringent and is applied externally to fresh cuts and wounds[4]. When mixed with the powder of a clove (Syzygium aromaticum), it is used as an anthelmintic[6]. Internally, it is used in the treatment of chronic diarrhoea and dysentery[4][5]. It is also useful in the treatment of catarrhal ophthalmia[4][5]. The juice is also diuretic and is used in the treatment of dropsy and anasarca[4][5]. The leaf juice has also been used in the treatment of hysteria, epilepsy and insanity[4][5].

The plant is a folk remedy for anasarca, calculus, cancer, carbuncles, convulsions, cough, cramps, cystitis, diarrhoea, dropsy, dysentery, epilepsy, headache, haemorrhage, hypertension, hysteria, insanity, kidneys, laxative, measles, rubella, snakebite, sores, stones, tumours, uro-genital disorders, warts, and wounds[1].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Ground cover


Earth stabiliser

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination should take place within 2 weeks. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle, and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out into their permanent positions in late spring. There are almost 4,000,000 seeds per kilo[1]. Division in late spring. Very simple, plants can be propagated easily from rooted sideshoots, establishing quickly when planted straight into the soil[1].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cynodon dactylon. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a warm sunny position in a well-drained soil[3]. The plant can grow in very diverse conditions of soil and moisture, withstanding drought well and also tending to eliminate other plants[1]. It spreads quite rapidly, rooting at the nodes, becoming difficult to eradicate and can be a serious weed in cultivated land[1]. Bermudagrass is reported to tolerate an annual precipitation of 9 to 429cm, an annual temperature range of 5.9 to 27.8°C, and a pH in the range of 4.3 to 8.4. Reported from the Hindustani Centre of Diversity, Bermudagrass, or cvs thereof, is reported to tolerate alkali soil conditions, disease, drought, frost, grazing, herbicide, heavy metal, heavy soil, insects, laterite, nematodes, peat, poor soil, salt, sand, atmospheric pollution, ultraviolet, virus, water-logging and weeds[1]. It is unproductive in poor dry soils and is best adapted to relatively fertile, well-drained soils with a pH of 6.0-7.0, in humid areas. Plants withstand long periods of drought, as they produce little growth in dry weather[1].

This species is hardy to about -10°c[3]. Plants vary greatly in habit according to soil and climate, and occur in several natural strains which differ widely in size, colour (bright, yellow-green to dull blue-green), texture of stars and leaves, size of spikes, and grazing value. Most varieties are poor seeders and are propagated by their creeping stem.

Bermudagrass can form dense cover in almost pure stands, practically anywhere. Abundant as a weed along roadsides, in lawns, on sandy wastes, along sand dunes, and readily takes possession of any uncultivated area[1].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cynodon dactylon. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cynodon dactylon.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cynodon dactylon
Genus
Cynodon
Family
Gramineae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Salinity
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type

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References

  1. ? 1.001.011.021.031.041.051.061.071.081.091.101.111.121.131.141.151.161.171.18 Duke. J. Handbook of Energy Crops - (1983-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Diggs, Jnr. G.M.; Lipscomb. B. L. & O'Kennon. R. J [Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas] Botanical Research Institute, Texas. (1999-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.4 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.64.7 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.5 Medicinal Plants of Nepal Dept. of Medicinal Plants. Nepal. (1993-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (2002-00-00)
  7. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)

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