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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw or cooked[1][2][3]. Juicy[4]. Bitter and unpalatable according to some reports[5], it was mixed with other fruits such as juneberries (Amelanchier spp) and then dried for winter use by native North Americans[3]. The fruit can cause nausea[6]. The fruit is up to 9mm in diameter[7].

Seed[4]. No more details are given, but the seeds are quite small and woody, looking rather less than edible[K].

An edible oil is obtained from the seed[8].

Fruit

Unknown part

Oil

Material uses

A fibre obtained from the bark is used as cordage[9]. The bark can be twisted into a rope[3].

The powdered bark has been used as a toothpowder to preserve the gums and keep the teeth white[8]. An oil obtained from the seed burns well and can be used in lighting[8]. A red dye can be obtained from the bark mixed with cedar ashes[3]. The branches are pliable, they are used as rims in basket making[9][3]. The stem wood is very tough and flexible[10].

Plants can be grown as a tall ground cover for colonising large areas. The cultivar 'Flaviramea' has been recommended[11].

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Red osier dogwood was widely employed by several native North American Indian tribes who valued it especially for its astringent and tonic bark, using it both internally and externally to treat diarrhoea, fevers, skin problems etc[3]. It is little used in modern herbalism.

The bark and the root bark are analgesic, astringent, febrifuge, purgative, slightly stimulant and tonic[8][6][3]. Drying the bark removes its tendency to purge[6]. A decoction has been used in the treatment of headaches, diarrhoea, coughs, colds and fevers[3]. Externally, the decoction has been used as a wash for sore eyes, styes and other infections and also to treat skin complaints such as poison ivy rash and ulcers[3]. The bark shavings have been applied as a dressing on wounds to stop the bleeding[3]. A poultice of the soaked inner bark, combined with ashes, has been used to alleviate pain[3].

The plant is said to have cured hydrophobia[8].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Ground cover

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame or in an outdoors seedbed if there is sufficient seed[12][13]. The seed must be separated from the fruit flesh since this contains germination inhibitors[12][14]. Stored seed should be cold stratified for 3 - 4 months and sown as early as possible in the year[14]. Scarification may also help as may a period of warm stratification before the cold stratification[12][14]. Germination, especially of stored seed, can be very slow, taking 18 months or more[14]. Prick out the seedlings of cold-frame sown seeds into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow the plants on for their first winter in a greenhouse, planting out in the spring after the last expected frosts.

Cuttings of half-ripe side shoots, July/August in a frame. Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, taken with a heel if possible, autumn in a cold frame. High percentage[15].

Layering of new growth in June/July. Takes 9 months[15].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cornus sericea. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in any soil of good or moderate fertility[16], ranging from acid to shallow chalk[7]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist soil and a position in sun or partial shade[17]. Succeeds in poorly drained soils[7].

Plants are hardy to about -35°c[18]. A rampant suckering shrub[16]. A number of cultivars have been developed for their ornamental value[19]. This species is closely allied to C. alba[20]. The flowers are very attractive to bees[17].

Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[7].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cornus sericea. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cornus sericea.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cornus sericea
Genus
Cornus
Family
Cornaceae
Imported References
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
2
Heat Zone
?
Water
high
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Yanovsky. E. Food Plants of the N. American Indians. Publication no. 237. U.S. Depf of Agriculture. ()
    3. ? 3.003.013.023.033.043.053.063.073.083.093.103.113.123.13 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Turner. N. J. and Szczawinski. A. Edible Wild Fruits and Nuts of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences (1978-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.5 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.58.68.7 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Turner. N. J. Plants in British Columbian Indian Technology. British Columbia Provincial Museum ISBN 0-7718-8117-7 (1979-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Craighead. J., Craighead. F. and Davis. R. A Field Guide to Rocky Mountain Wildflowers The Riverside Press ISBN 63-7093 (1963-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Thomas. G. S. Plants for Ground Cover J. M. Dent & Sons ISBN 0-460-12609-1 (1990-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.112.2 McMillan-Browse. P. Hardy Woody Plants from Seed. Grower Books ISBN 0-901361-21-6 (1985-00-00)
    13. ? Dirr. M. A. and Heuser. M. W. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation. Athens Ga. Varsity Press ISBN 0942375009 (1987-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.114.214.3 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    17. ? 17.017.1 International Bee Research Association. Garden Plants Valuable to Bees. International Bee Research Association. (1981-00-00)
    18. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Shrubs. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30258-2 (1989-00-00)
    19. ? Thomas. G. S. Ornamental Shrubs, Climbers and Bamboos. Murray ISBN 0-7195-5043-2 (1992-00-00)
    20. ? 20.020.1 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    21. ? Fernald. M. L. Gray's Manual of Botany. American Book Co. (1950-00-00)

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    Facts about "Cornus sericea"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyCornaceae +
    Belongs to genusCornus +
    Functions asGround cover +
    Has binomial nameCornus sericea +
    Has common nameRed Osier Dogwood +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partFruit +, Unknown part + and Seed +
    Has edible useUnknown use + and Oil +
    Has fertility typeBees +
    Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
    Has hardiness zone2 +
    Has lifecycle typePerennial +
    Has material partUnknown part +
    Has material useBasketry +, Dye +, Fibre +, Oil + and Dental care +
    Has mature height2.5 +
    Has mature width4 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useAnalgesic +, Astringent +, Febrifuge +, Miscellany +, Poultice +, Purgative +, Skin +, Stimulant + and Tonic +
    Has search namecornus sericea + and red osier dogwood +
    Has shade toleranceLight shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy +, Clay + and Heavy clay +
    Has sun preferenceFull sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameCornus sericea +
    Has water requirementshigh +
    Inhabits ecosystem nicheSoil surface +
    Is deciduous or evergreenDeciduous +
    Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedYes +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
    Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea +, Cornus sericea + and Cornus sericea +