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Uses

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Convolvulus erubescens.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Convolvulus erubescens.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Used in the treatment of diarrhoea, indigestion and stomach pains[1].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Climber

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown in situ as soon as it is ripe, it germinates in the autumn[2]. This species can become a real pest in the garden so it is unwise to encourage it.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Convolvulus erubescens. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

We have very little information on this species and do not know how cold hardy it will be in British gardens. It is hardy to about -7°c in Australian gardens[3], though this cannot be applied directly to British gardens due to our cooler summers and longer, colder and wetter winters. It is likely that this species will only succeed outdoors in the milder areas of the country. The following notes are based on the general needs of the genus.

Prefers a lighter basic soil[4] of low to medium fertility[5]. Bindweed is a very deep-rooting plant with a vigorous root system that extends to a considerable distance and is very hard to eradicate from the soil. Even a small piece of the root will grow into a new plant if it is left in the ground. Once established this plant soon becomes a pernicious weed[6][7]. It is a climbing plant that supports itself by twining around any support it can find and can soon swamp and strangle other plants[7]. The flowers close at night and also during rainy weather[7].

Some members of this genus harbour tobacco mosaic virus of the Solanaceae[8] and so should not be grown near potatoes, tomatoes and other members of that family.

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Convolvulus erubescens. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Convolvulus erubescens.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Convolvulus erubescens
Genus
Convolvulus
Family
Convolvulaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    2 x meters
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Lassak. E. V. and McCarthy. T. Australian Medicinal Plants. ()
    2. ? Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-00-00)
    3. ? Ewart. A. J. Flora of Victoria. ()
    4. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)
    5. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    6. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    8. ? Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-00-00)
    9. ? Carolin. R. & Tindale. M. Flora of the Sydney Region Reed. Australia. ISBN 0730104001 (1993-00-00)