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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit. - raw or cooked[1]. The fruit closely resembles a plum in its structure, the flesh is thick, juicy and very sweet with a hint of pine in its flavour[2][3]. The fruit is about 2 - 3cm long[4]. The fruit does not always ripen in Britain, before full ripeness it has a disgusting resinous flavour that coats the mouth and refuses to go away for hours[K]. Seed - raw or cooked[5][6]. Oily[7]. The seed has a firm texture and a slightly resinous flavour[K].

Fruit

Unknown part

Oil

Material uses

An oil obtained from the seed is used as an illuminant[6]. Very tolerant of pruning, this plant makes a very good hedge in shady positions[4].

Unknown part

Oil

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Cephalotaxus harringtonia drupacea.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Hedge

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame[8], it should then germinate in the following spring[K]. A hard seedcoat can delay germination, especially in if the seed is not sown as soon as it is ripe[81, K]. Stored seed should be cold-stratified and sown in a cold frame in the spring[4]. Germination can take 18 months or more. Prick out the seedlings as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on for at least their first winter under cover. Plant out in late spring after the last expected frosts. Greenwood cuttings of terminal shoots, August/September in a humid cold frame[7][4]. Difficult[8].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cephalotaxus harringtonia drupacea. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moist well-drained sandy soil but succeeds in most soils though it dislikes dry gravelly or chalky soils[7][4]. Prefers a position in semi-shade but tolerates full shade[9][5] and it also succeeds but does not usually thrive in full sun[4]. It grows very well in the mild wet coastal region of W. Scotland where it succeeds even in full sun[4]. Requires a humid sheltered site[4], strongly disliking very exposed positions[7].

Although the dormant plant is very cold-hardy, the young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K]. The Japanese plum yew is a very slow growing tree[10] with an excellent potential as a food crop in Britain. This subspecies is growing very well in the shade of other conifers at Kew botanical gardens, where it fruits regularly and heavily. Both the fruit and the seed are edible, these are often eaten in Japan. In addition, the seeds seem to be immune to the predations of squirrels. The seed on trees growing at Kew Botanical gardens are untouched even though virtually every other nut tree there has its crop destroyed[K]. Plants are dioecious, but female plants sometimes produce fruits and infertile seeds in the absence of any male plants[9]. However, at least one male plant for every five females should be grown if you are growing the plants for fruit and seed. Plants have also been known to change sex[5]. Male cones are produced in the axils of the previous year's leaves, whilst female cones are borne at the base of branchlets[4].

There has been some confusion in the naming of this plant. Some botanists have separated it off as a separate species, C. drupacea, though most nowadays include it as a subspecies of C. harringtonia, differing from the species in its shortly pedunculate male catkins[5]. In cultivation it is often known as the variety 'Fastigiata'[5].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cephalotaxus harringtonia drupacea. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cephalotaxus harringtonia drupacea.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cephalotaxus harringtonia drupacea
Genus
Cephalotaxus
Family
Cephalotaxaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
partial sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    5 x 3 meters
    Fertility
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    4. ? 4.004.014.024.034.044.054.064.074.084.094.104.11 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.5 Rushforth. K. Conifers. Christopher Helm ISBN 0-7470-2801-X (1987-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.3 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.4 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Dirr. M. A. and Heuser. M. W. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation. Athens Ga. Varsity Press ISBN 0942375009 (1987-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    10. ? Mitchell. A. F. Conifers in the British Isles. HMSO ISBN 0-11-710012-9 (1975-00-00)
    11. ? Wilson. E. H. Plantae Wilsonae. ()