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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

A refreshing and stimulating tea is made from the dried leaves, it is a good substitute for china tea though it does not contain caffeine[1][2][3][4][5][6][7][8].The leaves are gathered when the plant is in full bloom and are dried in the shade[8].

Unknown part

Tea

Material uses

A green dye is obtained from the flowers[9].

A cinnamon-coloured dye is obtained from the whole plant[10]. A red dye is obtained from the root[5][6].

The flowers are rich in saponins, when crushed and mixed with water they produce an excellent lather which is an effective and gentle soap[9][11]. They can be used as a body wash (simply rub the wet blossoms over the body) or to clean clothes[K]. The flowers were much used by the North American Indians as a body wash, especially by the women in preparation for marriage, and they leave the skin smelling fragrantly of the flowers[K].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The roots and root bark of New Jersey tea was used extensively by the North American Indians to treat fevers and problems of the mucous membranes such as catarrh and sore throats[12]. Current day usage of the roots concentrates on their astringent, expectorant and antispasmodic actions and they are employed in the treatment of complaints such as asthma, bronchitis and coughs[12].

The roots and root-bark are antispasmodic, antisyphilitic, strongly astringent (they contain 8% tannin), expectorant, haemostatic and sedative[2][13]. They have a stimulatory effect on the lymphatic system[14], whilst an alkaloid in the roots is mildly hypotensive[13]. The plant is used internally in the treatment of bronchial complaints including asthma and whooping cough, dysentery, sore throats, tonsillitis, haemorrhoids etc[10][13][14]. A decoction of the bark is used as a skin wash for cancer and venereal sores[15]. The powdered bark has been used to dust the sores[15].

The roots are unearthed and partially harvested in the autumn or spring when their red colour is at its deepest. They are dried for later use[14].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame. Stored seed should be pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then given 1 - 3 months stratification at 1°c[16][17]. Germination usually takes place in 1 - 2 months at 20°c[16]. One report says that the seed is best given boiling water treatment, or heated in 4 times its volume of sand at 90 - 120°c for 4 - 5 minutes and then soaked in warm water for 12 hours before sowing it[18]. The seed exhibits considerable longevity, when stored for 15 years in an air-tight dry container at 1 - 5°c it has shown little deterioration in viability[18]. The seed is ejected from its capsule with some force when fully ripe, timing the collection of seed can be difficult because unless collected just prior to dehiscence the seed is difficult to extract and rarely germinates satisfactorily[18]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle. Grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter and plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, taken at a node[17], July/August in a frame[19].

Cuttings of mature wood of the current year's growth, 7 - 12 cm with a heel, October in a cold frame[20]. The roots are quite brittle and it is best to pot up the callused cuttings in spring, just before the roots break[20]. Good percentage.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Ceanothus americanus. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a warm sunny position but tolerates light shade[19][17]. Tolerates some lime, but will not succeed on shallow chalk[17]. Another report says that it dislikes alkaline soils, though succeeds in poor dry conditions[14].

Plants dislike root disturbance, they should be planted out into their permanent positions whilst still small[21]. Dislikes heavy pruning, it is best not to cut out any wood thicker than a pencil[21]. Any pruning is best carried out in the spring[22]. Fast growing, it flowers well when young, often in its second year from seed[19]. Hybridizes freely with other members of this genus[17].

Some members of this genus have a symbiotic relationship with certain soil micro-organisms, these form nodules on the roots of the plants and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[17][23].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Ceanothus americanus. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Ceanothus americanus.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Ceanothus americanus
Genus
Ceanothus
Family
Rhamnaceae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.3 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.2 Fernald. M. L. Gray's Manual of Botany. American Book Co. (1950-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.3 Saunders. C. F. Edible and Useful Wild Plants of the United States and Canada. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-23310-3 (1976-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.3 McPherson. A. and S. Wild Food Plants of Indiana. Indiana University Press ISBN 0-253-28925-4 (1977-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Yanovsky. E. Food Plants of the N. American Indians. Publication no. 237. U.S. Depf of Agriculture. ()
    8. ? 8.08.18.2 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.2 Grae. I. Nature's Colors - Dyes from Plants. MacMillan Publishing Co. New York. ISBN 0-02-544950-8 (1974-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.210.3 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden. ()
    12. ? 12.012.112.2 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.113.213.3 Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.114.214.314.4 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.115.2 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
    16. ? 16.016.1 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 3. Thompson and Morgan. (1989-00-00)
    17. ? 17.017.117.217.317.417.517.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    18. ? 18.018.118.2 Matthews. V. The New Plantsman. Volume 1, 1994. Royal Horticultural Society ISBN 1352-4186 (1994-00-00)
    19. ? 19.019.119.219.3 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    20. ? 20.020.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    21. ? 21.021.1 Thomas. G. S. Ornamental Shrubs, Climbers and Bamboos. Murray ISBN 0-7195-5043-2 (1992-00-00)
    22. ? Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls Collins ISBN 0-00-219220-0 (1983-00-00)
    23. ? Craighead. J., Craighead. F. and Davis. R. A Field Guide to Rocky Mountain Wildflowers The Riverside Press ISBN 63-7093 (1963-00-00)

    "image:Ceanothus americanus1.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    Facts about "Ceanothus americanus"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyRhamnaceae +
    Belongs to genusCeanothus +
    Functions asNitrogen fixer +
    Has binomial nameCeanothus americanus +
    Has common nameNew Jersey Tea +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partUnknown part +
    Has edible useTea +
    Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
    Has growth rateVigorous +
    Has hardiness zone4 +
    Has imageCeanothus americanus1.jpg +
    Has lifecycle typePerennial +
    Has material partUnknown part +
    Has material useDye + and Soap +
    Has mature height1.2 +
    Has mature width1 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useAntispasmodic +, Astringent +, Expectorant +, Haemostatic +, Hypotensive +, Sedative + and VD +
    Has primary imageCeanothus americanus1.jpg +
    Has search nameceanothus americanus + and new jersey tea +
    Has shade toleranceLight shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral + and Alkaline +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy + and Loamy +
    Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
    Has sun preferenceFull sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameCeanothus americanus +
    Has water requirementsmoderate +
    Is deciduous or evergreenDeciduous +
    Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedYes +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
    Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus +, Ceanothus americanus + and Ceanothus americanus +