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Uses

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Bletilla striata.

Material uses

The bulb is mucilaginous, it is used as a size to impart a glossiness to ink and also to make an invisible ink (seen by wetting the paper and holding it up to the light)[1].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The hyacinth orchid is an important wound herb in China, where it has been used medicinally for over 1,500 years[2]. The root (actually a pseudobulb) is antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiphlogistic, demulcent, pectoral, skin, styptic and vulnerary[3][4][1]. It is taken internally in the treatment of haemorrhages of the stomach or lungs, uterine bleeding and nose bleeds[2]. It is particularly effective against the endotoxin produced by Haemophilus pertusis in whooping cough[4]. Externally, it is mixed with sesame oil and applied as a poultice to burns, cuts, abscesses and sores[2]. The pseudobulbs are harvested when the plant is dormant and are dried for use in decoctions and powders[2].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - surface sow, preferably as soon as it is ripe, in the greenhouse and do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed of this species is extremely simple, it has a minute embryo surrounded by a single layer of protective cells. It contains very little food reserves and depends upon a symbiotic relationship with a species of soil-dwelling fungus. The fungal hyphae invade the seed and enter the cells of the embryo. The orchid soon begins to digest the fungal tissue and this acts as a food supply for the plant until it is able to obtain nutrients from decaying material in the soil[5]. It is best to use some of the soil that is growing around established plants in order to introduce the fungus, or to sow the seed around a plant of the same species and allow the seedlings to grow on until they are large enough to move.

Division in autumn. Make sure that you keep plenty of soil with each plant. It is also said to be possible to transplant orchids after they have flowered but whilst they are still in leaf.

Division is best carried out in the spring[6]. Each division should have a leading point and two, or preferably three, pseudobulbs/joints of the rhizome[6]. More propagating material can be obtained by cutting halfway through the rhizome during the previous growing season at the point where you wish to divide[6]. This will stimulate the production of growth buds at the point of division[6].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Bletilla striata. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a friable, damp but well-drained soil enriched with leafmold[5]. Dislikes wet soils[5]. Requires shade from the midday sun[7]. Plants prefer a sheltered position in light shade, also succeeding in full sun in humus-rich soils[6].

Plants are hardy in favoured localities in Britain but they usually require greenhouse protection in this country[7]. Plants have grown well at Kew Botanical gardens, where they have formed large colonies[6]. Apply a good organic mulch in the late autumn or lift the bulbs and store them dry in a frost free place[5]. Plant out in spring and only just cover the bulb[5]. This species is cultivated in China as a medicinal plant[2]. Grows well with ferns in a woodland setting[5].

Orchids are, in general, shallow-rooting plants of well-drained low-fertility soils. Their symbiotic relationship with a fungus in the soil allows them to obtain sufficient nutrients and be able to compete successfully with other plants. They are very sensitive to the addition of fertilizers or fungicides since these can harm the symbiotic fungus and thus kill the orchid[6]. Plant the tubers no more than 5cm deep in the soil[8].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Bletilla striata. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Bletilla striata.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Bletilla striata
Genus
Bletilla
Family
Orchidaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
Shade
partial shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    ?
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


    "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Bletilla striata (1).jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.






    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.32.42.5 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.55.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.46.56.6 Cribb. P. & Bailes. C. Hardy Orchids. Orchids for the Garden and Frost-free Greenhouse. Christopher Helm. London. ISBN 0 7470 0416 1 (1989-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    8. ? Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
    9. ? Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)

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