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Uses

Toxic parts

The leaves contain saponins. Although poisonous, saponins are poorly absorbed by the human body and so most pass through without harm. Saponins are quite bitter and can be found in many common foods such as some beans. They can be removed by carefully leaching in running water. Thorough cooking, and perhaps changing the cooking water once, will also normally remove most of them. However, it is not advisable to eat large quantities of food that contain saponins. Saponins are much more toxic to some creatures, such as fish, and hunting tribes have traditionally put large quantities of them in streams, lakes etc in order to stupefy or kill the fish[K].

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw[1][2][3]. Aromatic, mealy and pleasant[4]. Remove the seeds before eating the fruit[4]. The fruit does not have a pulp[5] and is dry and boring[K]. The deep blue fruit is up to 25mm long[6].

Fruit

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Billardiera longiflora.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Billardiera longiflora.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Climber

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown in a warm greenhouse as soon as it is ripe. Only just cover the seed. Sow stored seed in early spring in a warm greenhouse. The germination of fresh seed is usually prolific, but stored seed can take a year to germinate[7]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, 10 - 12cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Fair percentage.

Layering.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Billardiera longiflora. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a moist well-drained humus-rich lime-free soil in a sheltered position in sun or semi-shade with a cool root run[1][8][9][7].

Plants are only hardy to about -5°c[10]. They succeed outdoors only in the mildest areas of Britain[11][1][12]. They can survive quite cold winters outdoors if given a suitable position[13]. They are hardy to at least -7°c in Australian gardens[2] though this cannot be translated directly to British gardens because of our cooler summers and longer, wetter and colder winters. Mulching the roots in winter will provide extra protection for the plant and even if the top is cut back by the cold it might resprout from the base[7]. A very ornamental plant[11].The flowers are deliciously scented[14].

Any pruning is best done in spring[15].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Billardiera longiflora. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Billardiera longiflora.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Billardiera longiflora
Genus
Billardiera
Family
Pittosporaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
8
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    ?
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 Simmons. A. E. Growing Unusual Fruit. David and Charles ISBN 0-7153-5531-7 (1972-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.2 Wrigley. J. W. and Fagg. M. Australian Native Plants. Collins. (Australia) ISBN 0-7322-0021-0 (1988-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.2 Cribb. A. B. and J. W. Wild Food in Australia. Fontana ISBN 0-00-634436-4 (1976-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.2 Ewart. A. J. Flora of Victoria. ()
    6. ? 6.06.1 Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls Collins ISBN 0-00-219220-0 (1983-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    9. ? Brown. Shade Plants for Garden and Woodland. ()
    10. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Conservatory and Indoor Plants Volumes 1 & 2 Pan Books, London. ISBN 0-330-37376-5 (1998-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    12. ? Arnold-Forster. Shrubs for the Milder Counties. ()
    13. ? ? The Plantsman. Vol. 2. 1980 - 1981. Royal Horticultural Society (1980-00-00)
    14. ? Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
    15. ? Davis. B. Climbers and Wall Shrubs. Viking. ISBN 0-670-82929-3 (1990-00-00)