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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Root - raw or cooked. The root contains 16 - 20% sugar and this is often extracted and used as a sweetener[1]. This plant is a major source of sugar in many temperate areas. The root can also be used as a vegetable. When cooked it is quite tender, but with some fibrous strands. It has a very sweet flavour that some people find too sweet[K]. The raw root is rather tough, but makes a pleasant addition to salads when grated finely[K]. Leaves - raw or cooked. A very acceptable spinach substitute[K]. Some people dislike the raw leaves since they can leave an unpleasant taste in the mouth[K].

Leaves

Unknown part

Material uses

Sugar beet has excellent potential as a biomass crop, both as a source of sugar and also using the plant residue for fuel[2].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Although little used in modern herbalism, beet has a long history of folk use, especially in the treatment of tumours[2].

A decoction prepared from the seed has been used as a remedy for tumours of the intestines. The seed, boiled in water, is said to cure genital tumours[2]. The juice or other parts of the plant is said to help in the treatment of tumours, leukaemia and other forms of cancer such as cancer of the breast, oesophagus, glands, head, intestines, leg, lip, lung, prostate, rectum, spleen, stomach, and uterus[2]. Some figure that betacyanin and anthocyanin are important in the exchange of substances of cancer cells; others note two main components of the amines, choline and its oxidation product betaine, whose absence produces tumours in mice[2]. The juice has been applied to ulcers[2]. A decoction is used as a purgative by those who suffer from haemorrhoids in South Africa[2]. Leaves and roots used as an emmenagogue[2]. Plant effective in the treatment of feline ascariasis[2].

In the old days, beet juice was recommended as a remedy for anaemia and yellow jaundice, and, put into the nostrils to purge the head, clear ringing ears, and alleviate toothache[2]. Beet juice in vinegar was said to rid the scalp of dandruff as scurf, and was recommended to prevent falling hair[2]. Juice of the white beet was said to clear obstructions of the liver and spleen[2]. Culpepper (1653) recommended it for treating headache and vertigo as well as all affections of the brain[2].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow April in situ.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Beta vulgaris altissima. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Beets grow well in a variety of soils, growing best in a deep, friable well-drained soil abundant with organic matter, but doing poorly on clay. They prefer an open position and a light well-drained soil[3]. The optimum pH is 6.0 - 6.8, but neutral and alkaline soils are tolerated in some areas. Some salinity may be tolerated after the seedling stage. Beets are notable for their tolerance to manganese toxicity. Beet is reported to tolerate an annual precipitation of 23 to 315cm, an average annual temperature range of 5.0 to 26.6°C and a pH of 4.2 to 8.2[2]. Sugar beet is widely cultivated as a commercial sugar crop in temperate climates. About one third of all sugar production in the world is derived from this plant[2]. It is not usually grown on a garden scale. There are several named varieties[4].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Beta vulgaris altissima. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Beta vulgaris altissima.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Beta vulgaris altissima
Genus
Beta
Family
Chenopodiaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
5
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Salinity
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.1 Brouk. B. Plants Consumed by Man. Academic Press ISBN 0-12-136450-x (1975-00-00)
  2. ? 2.002.012.022.032.042.052.062.072.082.092.102.112.122.132.142.152.16 Duke. J. Handbook of Energy Crops - (1983-00-00)
  3. ? Larkcom. J. Salads all the Year Round. Hamlyn (1980-00-00)
  4. ? Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
  5. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)