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Uses

Toxic parts

The plant is poisonous if used in large quantities[1][2]. Even small quantities have been known to cause nervous disorders, convulsions, insomnia etc[3]. Just the scent of the plant has been known to cause headaches and nervousness in some people[4]. The plant contains thujone. In small quantities this acts as a brain stimulant but is toxic in excess[5].

Edible uses

Notes

Leaves are occasionally used as a flavouring[6][7][8]. Caution is advised, prolonged use is known to have a detrimental effect - see the notes above on toxicity[K].

Unknown part

Material uses

The fresh or dried shoots are said to repel insects and mice[9][10][1][4], they have been laid amongst clothing to repel moths and have also been used as a strewing herb[11][12][13]. An infusion of the plant is said to discourage slugs and insects[12][10][14]. The plant contains substances called sesquiterpene lactones, these are strongly insecticidal[5].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Wormwood is a very bitter plant with a long history of use as a medicinal herb. It is valued especially for its tonic effect on the liver, gallbladder and digestive system, and for its vermicidal activity[11][15][5]. It is an extremely useful medicine for those with weak and under-active digestion. It increases stomach acid and bile production, improving digestion and the absorption of nutrients[5]. It also eases wind and bloating and, if taken regularly, helps the body return to full vitality after a prolonged illness[5].

The leaves and flowering shoots are anthelmintic, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic, antitumor, carminative, cholagogue, emmenagogue, febrifuge, hypnotic, stimulant, stomachic, tonic and vermifuge[11][16][17][18][19][3][5]. The plant is harvested as it is coming into flower and then dried for later use[11]. Use with caution[17], the plant should be taken internally in small doses for short-term treatment only, preferably under the supervision of a qualified practitioner[15]. It should not be prescribed for children or pregnant women[15]. See also the notes above on toxicity. The extremely bitter leaves are chewed to stimulate the appetite[3]. The bitter taste on the tongue sets off a reflex action, stimulating stomach and other digestive secretions[5]. The leaves have been used with some success in the treatment of anorexia nervosa[20]. The plant is applied externally to bruises and bites[15]. A warm compress has been used to ease sprains and strained muscles[13].

A homeopathic remedy is made from the leaves[16]. It is used to stimulate bile and gastric juice production and to treat disorders of the liver and gall bladder[16].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - surface sow from late winter to early summer in a greenhouse. The seed usually germinates within 2 - 26 weeks at 15°c[21]. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots. They can be planted out in the summer, or kept in pots in a cold frame for the winter and then planted out in the spring.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood, July/August in a frame.

Division in spring or autumn.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Artemisia absinthum. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in any soil but it is best in a poor dry one with a warm aspect[22]. Established plants are very drought tolerant[23][24]. Plants are longer lived, more hardy and more aromatic when they are grown in a poor dry soil[25]. Easily grown in a well-drained circumneutral or slightly alkaline loamy soil, preferring a sunny position[26][24]. Prefers a shady situation according to another report[11]. Tolerates a pH in the range 4.8 to 8.2.

Wormwood is occasionally grown in the herb garden, there are some named forms[27]. The growing plant is said to inhibit the growth of fennel, sage, caraway, anise and most young plants, especially in wet years[12][10][1]. Wormwood is a good companion for carrots, however, helping to protect them from root fly[14]. This herb was at one time the principal flavouring in the liqueur 'Absinthe' but its use has now been banned in most countries since prolonged consumption can lead to chronic poisoning, epileptiform convulsions and degeneration of the central nervous system[20]. The scent of the plant attracts dogs[4].

Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[28].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Artemisia absinthum. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Artemisia absinthum.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Artemisia absinthum
Genus
Artemisia
Family
Compositae
Imported References
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Drought
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? 1.01.11.21.3 Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening. Garden Way, Vermont, USA. ISBN 0-88266-064-0 (1978-00-00)
  2. ? Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden. ()
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.55.65.75.8 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Vilmorin. A. The Vegetable Garden. Ten Speed Press ISBN 0-89815-041-8 ()
  7. ? 7.07.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.1 Mabey. R. Plants with a Purpose. Fontana ISBN 0-00-635555-2 (1979-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.110.210.3 Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants. Watkins (1979-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.211.311.411.511.6 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.112.212.3 Holtom. J. and Hylton. W. Complete Guide to Herbs. Rodale Press ISBN 0-87857-262-7 (1979-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.113.213.3 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
  14. ? 14.014.114.2 Allardice.P. A - Z of Companion Planting. Cassell Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-304-34324-2 (1993-00-00)
  15. ? 15.015.115.215.315.4 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
  16. ? 16.016.116.216.3 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
  17. ? 17.017.117.2 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
  18. ? 18.018.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
  19. ? 19.019.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
  20. ? 20.020.120.2 Phillips. R. & Foy. N. Herbs Pan Books Ltd. London. ISBN 0-330-30725-8 (1990-00-00)
  21. ? Rice. G. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 2. Thompson and Morgan. (1988-00-00)
  22. ? Thompson. B. The Gardener's Assistant. Blackie and Son. (1878-00-00)
  23. ? Chatto. B. The Dry Garden. Dent ISBN 0460045512 (1982-00-00)
  24. ? 24.024.124.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  25. ? Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)
  26. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  27. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Perennials Volumes 1 and 2. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30936-9 (1991-00-00)
  28. ? Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
  29. ? Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named PFAFimport-17

Cite error: <ref> tag with name "PFAFimport-100" defined in <references> is not used in prior text.


Facts about "Artemisia absinthum"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyCompositae +
Belongs to genusArtemisia +
Has binomial nameArtemisia absinthum +
Has common nameWormwood +
Has drought toleranceTolerant +
Has edible partUnknown part +
Has edible useCondiment +
Has environmental toleranceDrought +
Has fertility typeWind +
Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
Has hardiness zone4 +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useRepellent + and Strewing +
Has mature height1 +
Has mature width0.6 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAnthelmintic +, Antiseptic +, Antispasmodic +, Carminative +, Cholagogue +, Emmenagogue +, Febrifuge +, Homeopathy +, Hypnotic +, Stimulant +, Stomachic +, Tonic + and Vermifuge +
Has search nameartemisia absinthum + and wormwood +
Has shade toleranceLight shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral +, Alkaline + and Very alkaline +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy + and Loamy +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameArtemisia absinthum +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
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