Uses

Toxic parts

Regular ingestion of large quantities of these plants can be dangerous due to their high mineral content[9]. This report, which seems nonsensical, might refer to calcium oxalate. This mineral is found in I. capensis and so is probably also in other members of the genus. It can be harmful raw but is destroyed by thoroughly cooking or drying the plant[K]. People with a tendency to rheumatism, arthritis, gout, kidney stones and hyperacidity should take especial caution if including this plant in their diet[10].

Edible uses

Leaves, Young shoots

Cooked as an Unknown use

Leaves and young shoots - cooked[1][2].

Seed

Raw, Cooked as an Unknown use

Seed - raw or cooked[1]. They are difficult to collect in quantity, mainly because of their exploding seed capsules which scatter the ripe seed at the slightest touch[K].

Material uses

Plant

Dye

A dye is obtained from the plant[3][4]. The prepared juice has been used for dyeing fingers and toenails red[5].

Seeds

Oil

The seed contains 27% of a viscous oil, though the report does not mention if this oil is utilised for any purpose[6].

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Flowers

Antibiotic

The flowers, and their alcoholic extract, possess marked antibiotic activity against some pathogenic fungi and bacteria[6].

Poultice as a Burns

They are useful when applied to burns and scalds[6].

Tonic

The flowers are cooling, mucilaginous and tonic[6][8].

Juice as a Snakebites

The juice of the flowers is used to treat snakebites[8].

Seed

Cancer

The seed is expectorant and has been used in the treatment of cancer[7].

Plant

Cathartic

The plant is cathartic, diuretic and emetic[6].

Diuretic

The plant is cathartic, diuretic and emetic[6].

Emetic

The plant is cathartic, diuretic and emetic[6].

Joints

It is used in the treatment of pains in the joints[6].

Seeds

Expectorant

The seed is expectorant and has been used in the treatment of cancer[7].

Powdered as a Birthing aid

The powdered seeds are given to women during labour in order to provide strength[8].

Leaves

Juice as a Warts

The leaf juice is used as a treatment against warts[7].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring in a greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Impatiens balsamina. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in any reasonably good soil[11]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Prefers a moist well-drained humus rich soil in a cool site[12]. Another report says that this species requires warm, moist conditions[13]. Succeeds in sun or semi-shade[14].

Plants are not frost hardy, but can be grown outdoors in Britain by sowing the seed in a greenhouse and planting out after the last expected frosts. A polymorphic species[11], there are several named forms selected for their ornamental value[12].

This plant has seed capsules that spring open forcibly as the seed ripens to eject the seed a considerable distance. The capsules are sensitive to touch even before the seed is ripe, making seed collection difficult but fun[K].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Impatiens balsamina. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Impatiens balsamina.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Impatiens balsamina
Genus
Impatiens
Family
Balsaminaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
  • Leaves Young shoots (Unknown use)
  • Seed (Unknown use)
Material uses
  • Plant (Dye)
  • Seeds (Oil)
Medicinal uses
  • Flowers (Antibiotic)
  • Seed (Cancer)
  • Plant (Cathartic)
  • Plant (Diuretic)
  • Plant (Emetic)
  • Seeds (Expectorant)
  • Flowers (Burns)
  • Flowers (Tonic)
  • Leaves (Warts)
  • Plant (Joints)
  • Flowers (Snakebites)
  • Seeds (Birthing aid)
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    0.6 x 0.5
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (32202/01/01)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre (32202/01/01)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Polunin. O. and Stainton. A. Flowers of the Himalayas. Oxford Universtiy Press (32202/01/01)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    5. ? 5.05.1 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (32202/01/01)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.46.56.66.76.86.9 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (32202/01/01)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (32202/01/01)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.3 Manandhar. N. P. Plants and People of Nepal Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-527-6 (32202/01/01)
    9. ? Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
    10. ? Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (32202/01/01)
    11. ? 11.011.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (32202/01/01)
    12. ? 12.012.112.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (32202/01/01)
    13. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Conservatory and Indoor Plants Volumes 1 & 2 Pan Books, London. ISBN 0-330-37376-5 (32202/01/01)
    14. ? Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (32202/01/01)