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Toxic parts

Contact with the sap can cause photosensitivity in sensitive people[1].

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Hypericum hypericoides.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Hypericum hypericoides.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)


The root was chewed as an antidote to rattlesnake bites[3][1]. A tea made from the roots is used in the treatment of colic, fevers, pain, diarrhoea etc[1]. It is applied externally to ulcerated breasts[1]. A tea made from the leaves is used in the treatment of kidney and bladder ailments, skin problems and children's diarrhoea[2][1].

A milky substance obtained from the plant has been rubbed on sores[4].


Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.


Nothing listed.


Nothing listed.


Seed - sow spring in a greenhouse and only just cover the seed. Germination usually takes place within 1 - 3 months at 10°c. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts.

Cuttings of half-ripe wood 10 - 12 cm with a heel, July/August in a frame. Plant out in the following spring[5]. Cuttings of mature wood, 12 - 17cm with a heel, October/November in a sheltered position outdoors. Plants root by the spring. Good percentage[6].

Division in spring as new growth commences[6]. Very easy, larger clumps can be replanted direct into their permanent positions, though it is best to pot up smaller clumps and grow them on in a cold frame until they are rooting well. Plant them out in the spring.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Hypericum hypericoides. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.


Easily grown in any reasonably good well-drained but moisture retentive soil[7]. Succeeds in sun or semi-shade but flowers better in a sunny position[7]. Prefers a light loamy soil[8].

One report says that the plant requires frame protection in the winter[7] whilst another says that plants are hardy but short-lived at Kew[8]. It possibly suffers more from wet soils than from the cold, see the plant's native habitat above.

Plants in this genus are notably resistant to honey fungus[5].


Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Hypericum hypericoides. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Hypericum hypericoides.




None listed.


None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Binomial name
Hypericum hypericoides
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Hardiness Zone
Heat Zone
full sun
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    Flower Colour
    Flower Type


    1. ? Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
    2. ? Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Coffey. T. The History and Folklore of North American Wild Flowers. Facts on File. ISBN 0-8160-2624-6 (1993-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    5. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    7. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    8. ? Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    9. ? Fernald. M. L. Gray's Manual of Botany. American Book Co. (1950-00-00)