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Uses

Toxic parts

None known

Edible uses

Notes

Seed - raw or roasted and used in breads, cakes, biscuits, sweets etc[1][2][3][4][5][6][7]. An excellent nut for raw eating[K]. They can also be liquidized and used as a plant milk[7]. Rich in oil. The seed ripens in mid to late autumn and will probably need to be protected from squirrels[K]. When kept in a cool place, and not shelled, the seed should store for at least 12 months[K]. A clear yellow edible oil is obtained from the seed[8][3][7]. It is used in salad dressings, baking etc.

Unknown part

Material uses

The seed contains up to 65% of a non-drying oil, used in paints, cosmetics etc[5][9][10][11]. The whole seed can be used to polish and oil wood[12]. It is very easy to apply and produces a nice finish[K]. The finely ground seeds are used as an ingredient of face masks in cosmetics[8]. Plants can be grown as a tall hedge[13]. They need to be left untrimmed or only lightly trimmed if seed is required[13]. The bark and leaves are a source of tannin[8]. Wood - soft, easy to split, not very durable, beautifully veined. Used for inlay work, small items of furniture, hurdles, wattles, basketry, pea sticks etc[8][5][14][9][15][16][17][18]. The twigs are used as dowsing rods by water diviners[19]. The wood also yields a good quality charcoal, used by artists[16][20].

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The bark, leaves, catkins and fruits are sometimes used medicinally[8]. They are astringent, diaphoretic, febrifuge, nutritive and odontalgic[8]. The seed is stomachic and tonic[21]. The oil has a very gentle but constant and effective action in cases of infection with threadworm or pinworm in babies and young children[8].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Secondary canopy

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is harvested in autumn in a cold frame[22]. Germinates in late winter or spring. Stored seed should be pre-soaked in warm water for 48 hours and then given 2 weeks warm followed by 3 - 4 months cold stratification[22]. Germinates in 1 - 6 months at 20°c[22]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in a cold frame or sheltered place outdoors for their first winter. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer[K]. Layering in autumn. Easy, it takes about 6 months[23][24]. Division of suckers in early spring. Very easy, they can be planted out straight into their permanent positions.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Corylus avellana. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

An easily grown plant, it succeeds in most soils, but is in general more productive of seeds when grown on soils of moderate fertility[19][24]. It does less well in rich heavy soils or poor ones[19][16]. Does well in a loamy soil[19]. Very suitable for an alkaline soil[19], but it dislikes very acid soils[25]. Succeeds in a pH range 4.5 to 8.5, but prefers a range of 5 to 7[24]. Plants are fairly wind tolerant[26][19]. A very hardy plant, succeeding in all areas of Britain[24]. The flowers, however, are produced in late winter and early spring and can be damaged by heavy frosts at this time[24]. A parent, together with C. maxima, of many cultivated forms of filberts and cob nuts. There are many named varieties[19]. Plants are self-fertile but a more certain crop is obtained if more than one cultivar is grown[24]. The main difference between cob nuts and filberts is that the husk of a filbert is longer than the seed and often completely encloses it, whilst the husk on a cob nut is shorter than the seed[24]. Squirrels are a major pest of this plant, often decimating the crop of nuts[24]. Often grown as a coppiced shrub in woodlands, the stems have a variety of uses[14][27][28]. Members of this genus bear transplanting well and can be easily moved even when relatively large[19]. A food plant for the caterpillars of many lepidoptera species[29].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Corylus avellana. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Corylus avellana.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Corylus avellana
Genus
Corylus
Family
Betulaceae
Imported References
Medicinal uses
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
Herbaceous or Woody
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
Mature Size
6 x 3 meters
Fertility
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type

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"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki. "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki., "image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki."image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.





"image:Corylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.


References

  1. ? 1.01.1 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-01-01)
  2. ? 2.02.1 Mabey. R. Food for Free. Collins ISBN 0-00-219060-5 (1974-01-01)
  3. ? 3.03.13.2 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-01-01)
  4. ? 4.04.1 Loewenfeld. C. and Back. P. Britain's Wild Larder. David and Charles ISBN 0-7153-7971-2 ()
  5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.4 Triska. Dr. Hamlyn Encyclopaedia of Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-33545-3 (1975-01-01)
  6. ? 6.06.1 Harrison. S. Wallis. M. Masefield. G. The Oxford Book of Food Plants. Oxford University Press (1975-01-01)
  7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-01-01)
  8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.48.58.68.78.88.9 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-01-01)
  9. ? 9.09.19.2 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-01-01)
  10. ? 10.010.1 Schery. R. W. Plants for Man. ()
  11. ? 11.011.1 Bianchini. F., Corbetta. F. and Pistoia. M. Fruits of the Earth. ()
  12. ? 12.012.1 Mabey. R. Plants with a Purpose. Fontana ISBN 0-00-635555-2 (1979-01-01)
  13. ? 13.013.113.2 Shepherd. F.W. Hedges and Screens. Royal Horticultural Society. ISBN 0900629649 (1974-01-01)
  14. ? 14.014.114.2 Wright. D. Complete Book of Baskets and Basketry. David and Charles ISBN 0-7153-7449-4 (1977-01-01)
  15. ? 15.015.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-01-01)
  16. ? 16.016.116.216.3 Howes. F. N. Nuts. Faber (1948-01-01)
  17. ? 17.017.1 Freethy. R. From Agar to Zenery. The Crowood Press ISBN 0-946284-51-2 (1985-01-01)
  18. ? 18.018.1 ? The Plantsman. Vol. 5. 1983 - 1984. Royal Horticultural Society (1983-01-01)
  19. ? 19.019.119.219.319.419.519.619.719.819.9 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-01-01)
  20. ? 20.020.1 Turner. N. J. and Szczawinski. A. Edible Wild Fruits and Nuts of Canada. National Museum of Natural Sciences (1978-01-01)
  21. ? 21.021.1 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-01-01)
  22. ? 22.022.122.2 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-01-01)
  23. ? Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-01-01)
  24. ? 24.024.124.224.324.424.524.624.724.8 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-01-01)
  25. ? 25.025.1 Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-01-01)
  26. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-01-01)
  27. ? Ahrendt. Berberis and Mahonia. Journal of the Linnean Society, 57 (1961-01-01)
  28. ? Beckett. G. and K. Planting Native Trees and Shrubs. Jarrold (1979-01-01)
  29. ? Carter D. Butterflies and Moths in Britain and Europe. Pan ISBN 0-330-26642-x (1982-01-01)
Facts about "Corylus avellana"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Belongs to familyBetulaceae +
Belongs to genusCorylus +
Has binomial nameCorylus avellana +
Has common nameHazel +
Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
Has edible partUnknown part + and Seed +
Has edible useMilk +, Oil + and Unknown use +
Has environmental toleranceHigh wind +
Has fertility typeSelf fertile + and Wind +
Has flowers of typeMonoecious +
Has growth rateModerate +
Has hardiness zone4 +
Has imageCorylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg +
Has lifecycle typePerennial +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useBasketry +, Charcoal +, Cosmetic +, Oil +, Plant support +, Polish +, Tannin + and Wood +
Has mature height6 +
Has mature width3 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAnthelmintic +, Astringent +, Diaphoretic +, Febrifuge +, Nutritive +, Stomachic + and Tonic +
Has primary imageCorylus avellana Hazelnoot struik.jpg +
Has search namecorylus avellana + and hazel +
Has shade toleranceLight shade +
Has soil ph preferenceVery acid +, Acid +, Neutral +, Alkaline + and Very alkaline +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy + and Clay +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameCorylus avellana +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Inhabits ecosystem nicheSecondary canopy +
Is deciduous or evergreenDeciduous +
Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedYes +
PFAF edible use notes migratedYes +
PFAF material use notes migratedYes +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedYes +
PFAF propagation notes migratedYes +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedYes +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Tolerates windYes +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
Has subobjectThis property is a special property in this wiki.Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana +, Corylus avellana + and Corylus avellana +