Uses

Toxic parts

The plant is said to be a narctic hallucinogen that is known to have caused fatalities[7].

Edible uses

Young shoots

Raw as an Unknown use

Young shoots - raw[1].

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Ajuga reptans.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Whole

Dried, Fresh, Oil as an Aromatic

The whole plant is aromatic, astringent and bitter[2][1][3]. The plant is usually applied externally[1]. It is harvested as it comes into flower in late spring and dried for later use[2][1]. It is also commonly used fresh in ointments and medicated oils[4].

Dried, Fresh, Oil as an Astringent

The whole plant is aromatic, astringent and bitter[2][1][3]. The plant is usually applied externally[1]. It is harvested as it comes into flower in late spring and dried for later use[2][1]. It is also commonly used fresh in ointments and medicated oils[4].

Dried, Fresh, Oil as an Antihemorragic

Bugle has a long history of use as a wound herb and, although little used today, it is still considered very useful in arresting haemorrhages and is also used in the treatment of coughs and spitting of blood in incipient consumption[2][5][6]. The plant is usually applied externally[1]. It is harvested as it comes into flower in late spring and dried for later use[2][1]. It is also commonly used fresh in ointments and medicated oils[4].

Dried, Fresh, Oil as a Blood tonic

The plant contains digitalis-like substances (these are commonly found in Digitalis species and are used in treating heart complaints) and is thought to possess heart tonic properties[6]. The plant is usually applied externally[1]. It is harvested as it comes into flower in late spring and dried for later use[2][1]. It is also commonly used fresh in ointments and medicated oils[4].

Dried, Fresh, Oil as an Alcohol problems

It has also been considered good for the treatment of excessive alcohol intake[2]. The plant is usually applied externally[1]. It is harvested as it comes into flower in late spring and dried for later use[2][1]. It is also commonly used fresh in ointments and medicated oils[4].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Soil surface

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring or autumn in a cold frame. The seed usually germinates in 3 - 4 weeks at 10°c[8], though it can be erratic[4]. Prick out the seedlings when they are large enough to handle and plant them out in the summer[K]. Division of runners at almost any time of year. Very easy, the divisions can be planted straight out into their permanent positions if required.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Ajuga reptans. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a humus-rich, moisture retentive soil and partial shade[9][10][11]. Does well in marshy soil and in the spring meadow[12]. Grows well in dry shade[13][14] and is fairly drought tolerant once established, though it shows distress in severe drought[14].

Plants do not always ripen their seeds in Britain, they spread freely by runners, however, and soon form an extensive patch in suitable conditions[2]. A number of forms have been selected for their ornamental value, several of them are variegated and these are used especially as ground cover plants for dry shade[13]. A purple-leafed form, 'Atropurpurea' does well in full sun so long as the soil is not dry[15].

A good bee and butterfly plant[12].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Ajuga reptans. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Ajuga reptans.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Ajuga reptans
Genus
Ajuga
Family
Labiatae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
  • Young shoots (Unknown use)
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
  • Whole (Aromatic)
  • Whole (Astringent)
  • Whole (Antihemorragic)
  • Whole (Blood tonic)
  • Whole (Alcohol problems)
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
high
Sun
full sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Drought
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
0.3 x 0.6
Fertility
Pollinators
?
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type










Ground cover



References

  1. ? 1.001.011.021.031.041.051.061.071.081.091.101.111.121.131.14 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (32202/01/01)
  2. ? 2.002.012.022.032.042.052.062.072.082.092.10 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (32202/01/01)
  3. ? 3.03.13.2 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (32202/01/01)
  4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.6 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (32202/01/01)
  5. ? 5.05.1 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (32202/01/01)
  6. ? 6.06.16.2 Stuart. M. (Editor) The Encyclopedia of Herbs and Herbalism Orbis Publishing. London. ISBN 0-85613-067-2 (32202/01/01)
  7. ? Diggs, Jnr. G.M.; Lipscomb. B. L. & O'Kennon. R. J [Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas] Botanical Research Institute, Texas. (32202/01/01)
  8. ? Rice. G. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 1. Thompson and Morgan. (32202/01/01)
  9. ? Knight. F. P. Plants for Shade. Royal Horticultural Society. ISBN 0-900629-78-9 (32202/01/01)
  10. ? Brown. Shade Plants for Garden and Woodland. ()
  11. ? 11.011.111.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (32202/01/01)
  12. ? 12.012.1 Baines. C. Making a Wildlife Garden. ()
  13. ? 13.013.1 Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Perennials Volumes 1 and 2. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30936-9 (32202/01/01)
  14. ? 14.014.1 Chatto. B. The Dry Garden. Dent ISBN 0460045512 (32202/01/01)
  15. ? 15.015.1 Thomas. G. S. Plants for Ground Cover J. M. Dent & Sons ISBN 0-460-12609-1 (32202/01/01)
  16. ? Royal Horticultural Society. Ground Cover Plants. Cassells. ISBN 0-304-31089-1 (32202/01/01)
  17. ? Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (32202/01/01)

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