This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Seed - cooked. Sweet and nutritious[1]. The seed contains about 20% protein[1]. The seed ranges from 4 - 10mm long and 4 - 6mm wide. Acacia seeds are highly nutritious and contain approx 26% protein, 26% available carbohydrate, 32% fibre and 9% fat[2]. The fat content is higher than most legumes with the aril providing the bulk of fatty acids present[2]. These fatty acids are largely unsaturated which is a distinct health advantage although it presents storage problems as such fats readily oxidise[2]. The mean total carbohydrate content of 55.8 + 13.7% is lower than that of lentils, but higher than that of soybeans while the mean fibre content of 32.3 + 14.3% is higher than that of other legumes such as lentils with a level of 11.7%[2]. The energy content is high in all species tested, averaging 1480+270 kJ per 100g[2]. Wattle seeds are low glycaemic index foods. The starch is digested and absorbed very slowly, producing a small, but sustained rise in blood glucose and so delaying the onset of exhaustion in prolonged exercise[2]. Flowers - cooked[3]. Rich in pollen, they are often used in fritters.

Flowers

Material uses

A yellow dye is obtained from the flowers[4].

A green dye is obtained from the seed pods[4]. The extensive root system of this plant helps to prevent soil erosion[5].

The wood has been used for making small tools and implements[2].

Unknown part

Dye

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Acacia coriacea.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Earth stabiliser


Nitrogen fixer

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a sunny position in a warm greenhouse[6]. Stored seed should be scarified, pre-soaked for 12 hours in warm water and then sown in a warm greenhouse in March. The seed germinates in 3 - 4 weeks at 25°c[7]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle and grow on in a sunny position in the greenhouse for at least their first winter. Plant out in early summer and consider giving some protection from winter cold for their first year or two outdoors. Cuttings of half-ripe wood with a heel, July/August in individual pots in a frame[8]. Overwinter in a greenhouse for the first winter and plant out in their permanent positions in late spring or early summer. Fair percentage[8].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Acacia coriacea. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a sandy loam and a very sunny position[6]. Succeeds in dry soils. Succeeds in any good garden soil that is not excessively limey[9]. Most species become chlorotic on limey soils[5].

Trees are not very hardy outdoors in Britain, even in the mildest areas of the country they are likely to be killed in excessively harsh winters[9]. This is one of the most drought-tolerant tropical acacias of North and North West Australia, being able to survive years with no more than 50 mm of rain in 20 days in its native area of distribution. Rainfall in its native habitat varies from 200 to 500 mm.

This species has a symbiotic relationship with certain soil bacteria, these bacteria form nodules on the roots and fix atmospheric nitrogen. Some of this nitrogen is utilized by the growing plant but some can also be used by other plants growing nearby[5].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Acacia coriacea. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Acacia coriacea.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Acacia coriacea
Genus
Acacia
Family
Leguminosae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
?
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    x meters
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type












    Cite error: <ref> tags exist, but no <references/> tag was found