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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Leaves - cooked[1]. An emergency food, it is only used when better foods are not available[2].

Leaves

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Inula britannica chinensis.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Xuan Fu Hua is used in Chinese herbalism as a mildly warming expectorant remedy and it is especially suitable where phlegm has accumulated in the chest[3]. It has been used as an adulterant of arnica (Arnica montana)[4]. The flowers are more commonly used, but the leaves are also used, generally for less serious conditions[3].

The leaf is discutient and vulnerary[5]. The flowers are alterative, antibacterial, carminative, cholagogue, deobstruent, depurative, diuretic, expectorant, laxative, nervine, stomachic, tonic and vulnerary[6][7][8][5][9]. They are used internally in the treatment of bronchial complaints with profuse phlegm, nausea and vomiting, hiccups and flatulence[7][10]. The flowers have an antibacterial action, but this can be destroyed by proteins in the body[7]. The plant is harvested when in flower and can be dried for later use[3]. The root is discutient, resolvent and vulnerary[5].

The plant has been mentioned as a possible treatment for cancer of the oesophagus[5].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow spring or autumn in a cold frame. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and plant them out in the summer.

If you have sufficient seed, it is worthwhile trying a sowing in situ in the spring or the autumn.

Division in spring or autumn[11].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Inula britannica chinensis. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Succeeds in a sunny position in any moderately fertile well-drained soil[12]. Grows well in heavy clay soils.

Plants are hardy to at least -15°c[10].

This sub-species is the form that is most used medicinally, it is cultivated as a medicinal plant in China[8].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Inula britannica chinensis. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Inula britannica chinensis.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Inula britannica chinensis
Genus
Inula
Family
Compositae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Reid. B. E. Famine Foods of the Chiu-Huang Pen-ts'ao. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre (1977-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.4 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.2 Stuart. Rev. G. A. Chinese Materia Medica. Taipei. Southern Materials Centre ()
    9. ? 9.09.1 Medicinal Plants in the Republic of Korea World Health Organisation, Manila ISBN 92 9061 120 0 (1998-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    11. ? Sanders. T. W. Popular Hardy Perennials. Collingridge (1926-00-00)
    12. ? Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    13. ? Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)