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Uses

Toxic parts

Although we have found no reports of toxicity for this species, a number of ferns contain carcinogens so some caution is advisable[1]. Many ferns also contain thiaminase, an enzyme that robs the body of its vitamin B complex. In small quantities this enzyme will do no harm to people eating an adequate diet that is rich in vitamin B, though large quantities can cause severe health problems. The enzyme is destroyed by heat or thorough drying, so cooking the plant will remove the thiaminase[2].

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Cyrtomium fortunei.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Cyrtomium fortunei.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The rhizome is analgesic, anthelmintic, antibacterial, anticoagulant, antiviral, depurative, febrifuge and haemostatic[3][4][5]. A decoction is used in the treatment of hookworm, tapeworm, ascariasis, filiariasis, acute infectious hepatitis and various bleeding ailments[3]. The decoction is also used as a preventative for influenza and measles[3].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Spores - best sown as soon as ripe on the surface of a humus-rich sterilized soil. Keep the compost moist, preferably by putting a plastic bag over the pot. Germinates in 1 - 3 months at 20°c[6]. Pot on small clumps of plantlets as soon as they are large enough to handle and keep humid until they are well established. Do not plant outside until the ferns are at least 2 years old and then only in a very well sheltered position. Division in spring or summer[7].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cyrtomium fortunei. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Requires a moderately loose soil, do not firm the soil any more than is necessary[8]. Tolerates a little direct sun but it grows better in the shade[1]. Grows well in a woodland garden[9]. Prefers a pH between 6 and 7 but this is not critical[1]. Dislikes too much winter moisture[8].

A very ornamental and hardy plant[8], tolerating temperatures down to about -30°c[1].

Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[10].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cyrtomium fortunei. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cyrtomium fortunei.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cyrtomium fortunei
Genus
Cyrtomium
Family
Dryopteridaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    ?
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.21.31.4 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    2. ? Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.3 ? A Barefoot Doctors Manual. Running Press ISBN 0-914294-92-X ()
    4. ? 4.04.1 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    6. ? Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-00-00)
    7. ? Brickell. C. The RHS Gardener's Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers Dorling Kindersley Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-86318-386-7 (1990-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.2 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    9. ? Taylor. J. The Milder Garden. Dent (1990-00-00)
    10. ? Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
    11. ? Ohwi. G. Flora of Japan. (English translation) Smithsonian Institution (1965-00-00)
    12. ? www.foj.info Flora of Japan ()