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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

An edible starch is obtained from the bulb[1][2][3]. Young leaves - cooked. This use will considerably weaken the plant and is not to be recommended in normal situations[1][2].

Leaves

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Cardiocrinum cordatum.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

There are no medicinal uses listed for Cardiocrinum cordatum.

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame in the autumn. The plant has delayed epigeal germination and will often germinate in the spring but can take up to 2 years especially if the seed is stored prior to being sown[4]. An alternative is to mix the seed with some moist leafmould and seal it in a plastic bag. Keep this at a temperature of 20°c for 3 weeks then pot up any seed that germinates and place the rest in a fridge for 4 - 5 weeks at 3 - 5°c before sowing in a warm place[5]. Seedlings should be grown on in pots in a shaded position in a cold frame or greenhouse for 3 - 4 years before planting them out in their permanent positions[5]. Bulblets are obtained from the base of the old plant after flowering. Pot up and plant out when well established.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Cardiocrinum cordatum. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moist well-drained position in shade and a soil that is rich in leafmould[6][7]. Requires a deep, very fertile humus-laden soil[8]. Prefers growing in woodland conditions[9][7].

The dormant plant is in general hardy to about -10°c but it comes into growth very early in the year, sometimes in February, and the young growth is susceptible to frost damage[10][7]. A monocarpic plant, the bulb takes about 7 years to reach flowering size but then dies after flowering. However, it produces a number of new bulblets at the base and can be propagated by these[6][7]. These bulblets take 3 - 5 years to flower[7]. The flowers are sweetly scented[11]. When planting, only just cover the bulb with leafmould[6]. The bulb is very attractive to slugs, mice and voles and may require protection[7].

Plants seem to be immune to the predations of rabbits[8].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Cardiocrinum cordatum. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Cardiocrinum cordatum.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Cardiocrinum cordatum
Genus
Cardiocrinum
Family
Liliaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
7
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
Shade
partial shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    ?
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.2 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    4. ? Rice. G. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 2. Thompson and Morgan. (1988-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 3. Thompson and Morgan. (1989-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.2 Fox. D. Growing Lilies. Croom Helm (1985-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.37.47.57.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)
    9. ? Grey. C. H. Hardy Bulbs. Williams & Norgate. (1938-00-00)
    10. ? Phillips. R. and Rix. M. Bulbs Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30253-1 (1989-00-00)
    11. ? Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)