This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

Uses

Toxic parts

The whole plant is toxic and should only be used for external applications to unbroken skin[1].

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Arnica fulgens.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Arnica fulgens.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The whole plant, but especially the flowers and the root, is antiecchymotic, antiphlogistic, irritant, nervine, sternutatory, tonic and vulnerary[2][1].

This plant is used in North America in much the same way as A. montana is used in Europe[3]. These uses are as follows:-

Arnica has a long history of herbal use, especially as an external treatment for bruises and sprains[4][5] - it is an ingredient of a number of proprietary preparations[238. Internally, it has been used in the treatment of heart complaints and as a booster for the immune system[5]. Arnica increases local blood supply and accelerates healing, it is anti-inflammatory and increases the rate of absorption of internal bleeding[3]. Generally the plant is nowadays only recommended for internal use as a homeopathic medicine, principally for treating shock, injury and pain[3]. If used as a decoction or tincture it stimulates the circulation and is valuable in the treatment of angina and a weak or failing heart, but it can be toxic even at quite low doses and so is rarely used this way[3]. The flowers are the part most commonly used[6][4], they are harvested when fully open and dried - the receptacles are sometimes removed since these are liable to be attacked by insects[6]. The root is also used, it is harvested after the leaves have died down in the autumn and dried for later use[6]. The whole plant is antiecchymotic, antiphlogistic, nervine, sternutatory, vulnerary[6][7][8][9][10]. Although a very valuable remedy, it should be used with caution. It has been known to cause contact dermatitis when used externally and collapse when taken internally[5]. Only take it internally under the supervision of a qualified practitioner. The freshly crushed flowers cause sneezing if inhaled[4]. The leaves have also been smoked as a tobacco[4], though it is unclear whether this was for medicinal reasons

The whole plant, harvested when in flower, is used in homeopathic remedies[4]. It is especially useful in the treatment of traumatic injuries, sores and bruises[4].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow early spring in a cold frame[11]. Only just cover the seed and make sure that the compost does not dry out. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse or cold frame for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer. Division in spring[11].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Arnica fulgens. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moist, well-drained humus rich soil, preferably lime-free[11]. Prefers a mixture of sand, loam and peat[12].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Arnica fulgens. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Arnica fulgens.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Arnica fulgens
Genus
Arnica
Family
Compositae
Imported References
Edible uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    ?
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Schofield. J. J. Discovering Wild Plants - Alaska, W. Canada and the Northwest. ()
    2. ? 2.02.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.4 Chevallier. A. The Encyclopedia of Medicinal Plants Dorling Kindersley. London ISBN 9-780751-303148 (1996-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.54.6 Castro. M. The Complete Homeopathy Handbook. Macmillan. London. ISBN 0-333-55581-3 (1990-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.3 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.4 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Chiej. R. Encyclopaedia of Medicinal Plants. MacDonald ISBN 0-356-10541-5 (1984-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
    11. ? 11.011.111.211.3 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    12. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    13. ? Hitchcock. C. L. Vascular Plants of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press (1955-00-00)