This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

m (Text replace - "|uses=" to "|material use notes=")
(Migrating article to Creative Commons BY-SA, isolating PFAF NC content for manual migration. See the page: Migrating PFAF Licensing)
 
(3 intermediate revisions by 2 users not shown)
Line 25: Line 25:
 
|life cycle=perennial
 
|life cycle=perennial
 
|herbaceous or woody=woody
 
|herbaceous or woody=woody
|deciduous or evergreen=deciduous
+
|deciduous or evergreen=evergreen
|mature measurement unit=meters
+
||mature measurement unit=meters
 
|mature height=3
 
|mature height=3
 
|flower type=hermaphrodite
 
|flower type=hermaphrodite
Line 34: Line 34:
 
|material uses references=PFAFimport-61,PFAFimport-240
 
|material uses references=PFAFimport-61,PFAFimport-240
  
|cultivation=Prefers a moderately heavy loam with a generous amount of compost and sand added and a very sunny position{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Prefers a pH between 5 and 6{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Intolerant of water logging{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}, strongly disliking winter wet{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}.
+
|cultivation notes=
 +
|PFAF cultivation notes=Prefers a moderately heavy loam with a generous amount of compost and sand added and a very sunny position{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Prefers a pH between 5 and 6{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Intolerant of water logging{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}, strongly disliking winter wet{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}.
 
Most reports say that this species is not hardy in Britain, requiring greenhouse protection{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}, but one report says that a plant outdoors at Boslewick in Cornwall produces fruit{{Ref | PFAFimport-59}}.
 
Most reports say that this species is not hardy in Britain, requiring greenhouse protection{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}, but one report says that a plant outdoors at Boslewick in Cornwall produces fruit{{Ref | PFAFimport-59}}.
 
Plants are sometimes cultivated for their edible fruit{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}.
 
Plants are sometimes cultivated for their edible fruit{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}.
 
All parts of the plant are aromatic. The white flowers have a scent of orange blossom{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}. The leaves are covered in pellucid dots and release a resinous scent when bruised{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}. The fruits are lemon-scented{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}.
 
All parts of the plant are aromatic. The white flowers have a scent of orange blossom{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}. The leaves are covered in pellucid dots and release a resinous scent when bruised{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}. The fruits are lemon-scented{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}.
|propagation=Seed - we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a warm greenhouse as soon as it is ripe if this is possible. Otherwise sow the seed in early spring in a warm greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first two winters. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Consider giving them some protection from the cold for at least their first winter outdoors.
+
|propagation notes=
 +
|PFAF propagation notes=Seed - we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a warm greenhouse as soon as it is ripe if this is possible. Otherwise sow the seed in early spring in a warm greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first two winters. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Consider giving them some protection from the cold for at least their first winter outdoors.
 
|range=E. Asia - China.
 
|range=E. Asia - China.
 
|habitat=Arid ground{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}.
 
|habitat=Arid ground{{Ref | PFAFimport-245}}.
|material use notes=The leaves are used as an aromatic bath{{Ref | PFAFimport-61}}. The leaves are used as cosmetics{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}.
+
|material use notes=
 +
|PFAF material use notes=The leaves are used as an aromatic bath{{Ref | PFAFimport-61}}. The leaves are used as cosmetics{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}.
 
A gum runs from the stem{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}, though the report does not mention any uses for this gum.
 
A gum runs from the stem{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}, though the report does not mention any uses for this gum.
|edible=Fruit - raw or cooked{{Ref | PFAFimport-2}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-105}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-177}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}. Red and fleshy{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}, the fully ripe fruit has an agreeable sweet taste{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-2}}. Aromatic, juicy and somewhat mucilaginous, the fruit can also be pickled or made into jams etc{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}. The fruit is about 15mm in diameter{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}.
+
|edible use notes=
|medicinal use notes=The leaves are applied to the body in the treatment of diarrhoea, colic and skin diseases{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}.
+
|PFAF edible use notes=Fruit - raw or cooked{{Ref | PFAFimport-2}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-105}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-177}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}. Red and fleshy{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}, the fully ripe fruit has an agreeable sweet taste{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-2}}. Aromatic, juicy and somewhat mucilaginous, the fruit can also be pickled or made into jams etc{{Ref | PFAFimport-183}}. The fruit is about 15mm in diameter{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}.
 +
|medicinal use notes=
 +
|PFAF medicinal use notes=The leaves are applied to the body in the treatment of diarrhoea, colic and skin diseases{{Ref | PFAFimport-240}}.
 
|enabled=Yes
 
|enabled=Yes
 
|title irregular=No
 
|title irregular=No
Line 110: Line 115:
 
|id=ISBN 0-7090-5440-8
 
|id=ISBN 0-7090-5440-8
 
|date=1994-00-00}}
 
|date=1994-00-00}}
 +
}}{{Article state
 +
|article cleanup=Yes
 +
|article incomplete=Yes
 +
|article citations=No
 
}}
 
}}

Latest revision as of 15:12, 4 May 2013

Uses

Edible uses

Notes

Fruit - raw or cooked[1][2][3][4]. Red and fleshy[5], the fully ripe fruit has an agreeable sweet taste[5][1]. Aromatic, juicy and somewhat mucilaginous, the fruit can also be pickled or made into jams etc[4]. The fruit is about 15mm in diameter[6].

Fruit

Material uses

The leaves are used as an aromatic bath[7]. The leaves are used as cosmetics[8]. A gum runs from the stem[8], though the report does not mention any uses for this gum.

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

The leaves are applied to the body in the treatment of diarrhoea, colic and skin diseases[8].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - we have no information for this species but suggest sowing the seed in a warm greenhouse as soon as it is ripe if this is possible. Otherwise sow the seed in early spring in a warm greenhouse. When they are large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on in the greenhouse for at least their first two winters. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Consider giving them some protection from the cold for at least their first winter outdoors.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Triphasia trifolia. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a moderately heavy loam with a generous amount of compost and sand added and a very sunny position[6]. Prefers a pH between 5 and 6[6]. Intolerant of water logging[6], strongly disliking winter wet[5].

Most reports say that this species is not hardy in Britain, requiring greenhouse protection[5][6], but one report says that a plant outdoors at Boslewick in Cornwall produces fruit[9]. Plants are sometimes cultivated for their edible fruit[4].

All parts of the plant are aromatic. The white flowers have a scent of orange blossom[10]. The leaves are covered in pellucid dots and release a resinous scent when bruised[10]. The fruits are lemon-scented[10].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Triphasia trifolia. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Triphasia trifolia.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Triphasia trifolia
Genus
Triphasia
Family
Rutaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
10
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    None listed.
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    3 x meters
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Hedrick. U. P. Sturtevant's Edible Plants of the World. Dover Publications ISBN 0-486-20459-6 (1972-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Tanaka. T. Tanaka's Cyclopaedia of Edible Plants of the World. Keigaku Publishing (1976-00-00)
    3. ? 3.03.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.24.3 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.4 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.16.26.36.46.56.6 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.28.38.4 Chopra. R. N., Nayar. S. L. and Chopra. I. C. Glossary of Indian Medicinal Plants (Including the Supplement). Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, New Delhi. (1986-00-00)
    9. ? Thurston. Trees and Shrubs in Cornwall. ()
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Genders. R. Scented Flora of the World. Robert Hale. London. ISBN 0-7090-5440-8 (1994-00-00)