This article has been marked as incomplete and in need of reformatting. Please help us to improve it.

Practical Plants is a community wiki. You can edit this page to improve the quality of the information it contains. To learn how, please read the editing guide.

(Adding article state template.)
(Migrating article to Creative Commons BY-SA, isolating PFAF NC content for manual migration. See the page: Migrating PFAF Licensing)
 
Line 32: Line 32:
 
|medicinal uses references=PFAFimport-4,PFAFimport-174,PFAFimport-238,PFAFimport-46,PFAFimport-61,PFAFimport-176,PFAFimport-218
 
|medicinal uses references=PFAFimport-4,PFAFimport-174,PFAFimport-238,PFAFimport-46,PFAFimport-61,PFAFimport-176,PFAFimport-218
  
|cultivation=Prefers a well-drained fertile light soil in full sun or semi shade{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. It only succeeds in full sun if the soil remains moist during the growing season{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Prefers a slightly acid soil{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}.
+
|cultivation notes=
 +
|PFAF cultivation notes=Prefers a well-drained fertile light soil in full sun or semi shade{{Ref | PFAFimport-1}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. It only succeeds in full sun if the soil remains moist during the growing season{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Prefers a slightly acid soil{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}.
 
Dormant plants are hardy to about -20°c{{Ref | PFAFimport-187}}. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K].
 
Dormant plants are hardy to about -20°c{{Ref | PFAFimport-187}}. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K].
 
An important herb in Chinese medicine, it is widely cultivated there{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}} and is used as a ginseng substitute{{Ref | PFAFimport-4}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}.
 
An important herb in Chinese medicine, it is widely cultivated there{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}} and is used as a ginseng substitute{{Ref | PFAFimport-4}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}.
Line 38: Line 39:
 
Plants resent root disturbance and should be planted out into their permanent position as soon as possible{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}.
 
Plants resent root disturbance and should be planted out into their permanent position as soon as possible{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}.
 
Plants are very susceptible to the ravages of slugs. The young shoots in spring are particularly at risk, though older growth is also eaten[K].
 
Plants are very susceptible to the ravages of slugs. The young shoots in spring are particularly at risk, though older growth is also eaten[K].
|propagation=Seed - surface sow in spring to early summer in an ericaceous compost in a greenhouse. Do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 6 weeks at 20°c{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer and protect them from slugs until the plants are well established[K].
+
|propagation notes=
 +
|PFAF propagation notes=Seed - surface sow in spring to early summer in an ericaceous compost in a greenhouse. Do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 6 weeks at 20°c{{Ref | PFAFimport-164}}. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer and protect them from slugs until the plants are well established[K].
 
Division in spring, with care, since the plant resents root disturbance{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. We have found it best to take small divisions that are teased out from the sides of the main clump so as to cause the least possible disturbance to the plants and to avoid having to dig up the clump. These small divisions need to be potted up and placed in light shade in a greenhouse until they are rooting well. They can be planted out into their permanent positions in the summer if they are large enough, otherwise in the following spring[K].
 
Division in spring, with care, since the plant resents root disturbance{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. We have found it best to take small divisions that are teased out from the sides of the main clump so as to cause the least possible disturbance to the plants and to avoid having to dig up the clump. These small divisions need to be potted up and placed in light shade in a greenhouse until they are rooting well. They can be planted out into their permanent positions in the summer if they are large enough, otherwise in the following spring[K].
 
|range=E. Asia - W. China.
 
|range=E. Asia - W. China.
 
|habitat=Alpine brush and rocky slopes{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Upland fields{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
 
|habitat=Alpine brush and rocky slopes{{Ref | PFAFimport-200}}. Upland fields{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
  
|medicinal use notes=This species is an important herb in Chinese medicine, the root is widely used as a substitute for ginseng{{Ref | PFAFimport-4}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It is a sweet, warm, soothing herb that is taken as an energy tonic{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It acts mainly on the spleen, lungs and stomach, raising secretion of body fluids and blood sugar levels, lowering the blood pressure and stimulating the immune system{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. The root and the whole plant are adaptogen, aphrodisiac and tonic{{Ref | PFAFimport-46}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-61}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-176}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-218}}. It is taken internally in the treatment of low energy, poor appetite and digestion, anaemia, shallow breathing and debility after illness{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It is often cooked with rice until it is glutinous as a tonic food{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
+
|medicinal use notes=
 +
|PFAF medicinal use notes=This species is an important herb in Chinese medicine, the root is widely used as a substitute for ginseng{{Ref | PFAFimport-4}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It is a sweet, warm, soothing herb that is taken as an energy tonic{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It acts mainly on the spleen, lungs and stomach, raising secretion of body fluids and blood sugar levels, lowering the blood pressure and stimulating the immune system{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. The root and the whole plant are adaptogen, aphrodisiac and tonic{{Ref | PFAFimport-46}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-61}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-174}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-176}}{{Ref | PFAFimport-218}}. It is taken internally in the treatment of low energy, poor appetite and digestion, anaemia, shallow breathing and debility after illness{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}. It is often cooked with rice until it is glutinous as a tonic food{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
 
The roots of plants at least three years old are harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
 
The roots of plants at least three years old are harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried{{Ref | PFAFimport-238}}.
 
|enabled=Yes
 
|enabled=Yes

Latest revision as of 12:49, 4 May 2013

Uses

Edible uses

There are no edible uses listed for Codonopsis tangshen.

Material uses

There are no material uses listed for Codonopsis tangshen.

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

This species is an important herb in Chinese medicine, the root is widely used as a substitute for ginseng[1][2][3]. It is a sweet, warm, soothing herb that is taken as an energy tonic[3]. It acts mainly on the spleen, lungs and stomach, raising secretion of body fluids and blood sugar levels, lowering the blood pressure and stimulating the immune system[3]. The root and the whole plant are adaptogen, aphrodisiac and tonic[4][5][2][6][7]. It is taken internally in the treatment of low energy, poor appetite and digestion, anaemia, shallow breathing and debility after illness[3]. It is often cooked with rice until it is glutinous as a tonic food[3]. The roots of plants at least three years old are harvested in the autumn and can be used fresh or dried[3].

Unknown part

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Climber

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - surface sow in spring to early summer in an ericaceous compost in a greenhouse. Do not allow the compost to dry out. The seed usually germinates in 1 - 6 weeks at 20°c[8]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots as soon as they are large enough to handle and grow them on in a greenhouse for their first winter. Plant out in late spring or early summer and protect them from slugs until the plants are well established[K]. Division in spring, with care, since the plant resents root disturbance[9]. We have found it best to take small divisions that are teased out from the sides of the main clump so as to cause the least possible disturbance to the plants and to avoid having to dig up the clump. These small divisions need to be potted up and placed in light shade in a greenhouse until they are rooting well. They can be planted out into their permanent positions in the summer if they are large enough, otherwise in the following spring[K].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Codonopsis tangshen. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a well-drained fertile light soil in full sun or semi shade[10][9]. It only succeeds in full sun if the soil remains moist during the growing season[9]. Prefers a slightly acid soil[8].

Dormant plants are hardy to about -20°c[11]. The young growth in spring, even on mature plants, is frost-tender and so it is best to grow the plants in a position sheltered from the early morning sun[K]. An important herb in Chinese medicine, it is widely cultivated there[3] and is used as a ginseng substitute[1][2]. A climbing plant, supporting itself by twining and scrambling over other plants[12]. Plants resent root disturbance and should be planted out into their permanent position as soon as possible[8].

Plants are very susceptible to the ravages of slugs. The young shoots in spring are particularly at risk, though older growth is also eaten[K].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Codonopsis tangshen. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Codonopsis tangshen.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Codonopsis tangshen
Genus
Codonopsis
Family
Campanulaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
4
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
light shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    ?
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    ?
    Mature Size
    3 x meters
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    ?
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type











    References

    1. ? 1.01.11.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.12.22.3 Kariyone. T. Atlas of Medicinal Plants. ()
    3. ? 3.03.13.23.33.43.53.63.7 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.1 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Yeung. Him-Che. Handbook of Chinese Herbs and Formulas. Institute of Chinese Medicine, Los Angeles (1985-00-00)
    7. ? 7.07.1 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.18.2 Bird. R. (Editor) Growing from Seed. Volume 4. Thompson and Morgan. (1990-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.19.29.3 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    10. ? F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    11. ? Phillips. R. & Rix. M. Perennials Volumes 1 and 2. Pan Books ISBN 0-330-30936-9 (1991-00-00)
    12. ? Grey-Wilson. C. & Matthews. V. Gardening on Walls Collins ISBN 0-00-219220-0 (1983-00-00)