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Uses

Toxic parts

Although no individual reports regarding this species have been seen, there have been cases of poisoning caused by the consumption, in large quantities and by some mammals, of certain members of this genus. Dogs seem to be particularly susceptible[1].

Edible uses

Notes

Bulb - raw or cooked. The small bulbs can vary considerably in size from 2 - 6cm[2], they have a pleasant mild garlic flavour[K].

Leaves - raw or cooked. The young leaves are pleasant raw, older leaves quickly become fibrous and are best cooked. They have a nice leek flavour[K]. The plants come into new growth in early winter and the leaves are often available from January[K]. Flowers - raw. A pleasant mild garlic flavour, but with a rather dry texture[K]. This species produces mainly bulbils and very few flowers[K].

The bulbils have a mild garlic flavour and make a nice flavouring in salads and cooked foods. Although produced abundantly, they are quite fiddly to use because they are small[K]. They can also be pickled[3].

Flowers

Leaves

Material uses

The juice of the plant is used as a moth repellent. The whole plant is said to repel insects and moles[4].

Unknown part

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

This species has the same medicinal virtues as garlic, but in a much milder and less effective form[5]. These virtues are as follows:-

Garlic has a very long folk history of use in a wide range of ailments, particularly ailments such as ringworm, Candida and vaginitis where its fungicidal, antiseptic, tonic and parasiticidal properties have proved of benefit[6]. It is also said to have anticancer activity[6]. Daily use of garlic in the diet has been shown to have a very beneficial effect on the body, especially the blood system and the heart. For example, demographic studies suggest that garlic is responsible for the low incidence of arteriosclerosis in areas of Italy and Spain where consumption of the bulb is heavy[7].

The bulb is said to be anthelmintic, antiasthmatic, anticholesterolemic, antiseptic, antispasmodic, cholagogue, diaphoretic, diuretic, expectorant, febrifuge, stimulant, stomachic, tonic, vasodilator[8][9][10][11][12][13]. The crushed bulb may be applied as a poultice to ease the pain of bites, stings etc[8][9][10][11].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - best sown as soon as it is ripe in a cold frame, though it can also be sown in a cold frame in the spring[2]. Prick out the seedlings into individual pots when they are large enough to handle. Well-grown plants can be planted out into their final positions in late summer or the autumn, otherwise grow them on for a further year in pots and plant them out the following summer. This species produces few if any seeds.

Division in late summer or early autumn. Dig up the bulbs when the plants are dormant and divide the small bulblets at the base of the larger bulb. Replant immediately, either in the open ground or in pots in a cold frame.

Bulbils - plant out as soon as they are ripe in late summer. The bulbils can be planted direct into their permanent positions, though you get better results if you pot them up and plant them out the following spring.

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Allium ampeloprasum babbingtonii. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a sunny position in a light well-drained soil[14]. Succeeds in clay soils[15]. Tolerates a pH in the range 5.2 to 8.3.

The bulbs should be planted fairly deeply[14]. Closely allied to the wild leek, A. ampeloprasum, differing mainly in its having more bulbils and fewer flowers in the flowering head[16]. Plants can spread freely by means of their bulbils and sometimes become a weed in the garden[15]. Where the plant is found wild in Britain it might be as a relic of early cultivation in monasteries etc[15]. Grows well with most plants, especially roses, carrots, beet and chamomile, but it inhibits the growth of legumes[17][4][18]. This plant is a bad companion for alfalfa, each species negatively affecting the other[19].

Members of this genus are rarely if ever troubled by browsing deer[20].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Allium ampeloprasum babbingtonii. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Allium ampeloprasum babbingtonii.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Allium ampeloprasum babbingtonii
Genus
Allium
Family
Alliaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
6
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
no shade
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
  • Strong wind
Ecosystems
Native Climate Zones
None listed.
Adapted Climate Zones
None listed.
Native Geographical Range
None listed.
Native Environment
None listed.
Ecosystem Niche
None listed.
Root Zone Tendancy
None listed.
Life
Deciduous or Evergreen
?
Herbaceous or Woody
?
Life Cycle
?
Growth Rate
?
Mature Size
Fertility
?
Pollinators
Flower Colour
?
Flower Type











References

  1. ? Cooper. M. and Johnson. A. Poisonous Plants in Britain and their Effects on Animals and Man. HMSO ISBN 0112425291 (1984-00-00)
  2. ? 2.02.12.2 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
  3. ? 3.03.1 Brouk. B. Plants Consumed by Man. Academic Press ISBN 0-12-136450-x (1975-00-00)
  4. ? 4.04.14.2 Riotte. L. Companion Planting for Successful Gardening. Garden Way, Vermont, USA. ISBN 0-88266-064-0 (1978-00-00)
  5. ? 5.05.1 Bown. D. Encyclopaedia of Herbs and their Uses. Dorling Kindersley, London. ISBN 0-7513-020-31 (1995-00-00)
  6. ? 6.06.16.2 Duke. J. A. and Ayensu. E. S. Medicinal Plants of China Reference Publications, Inc. ISBN 0-917256-20-4 (1985-00-00)
  7. ? 7.07.1 Foster. S. & Duke. J. A. A Field Guide to Medicinal Plants. Eastern and Central N. America. Houghton Mifflin Co. ISBN 0395467225 (1990-00-00)
  8. ? 8.08.18.2 Grieve. A Modern Herbal. Penguin ISBN 0-14-046-440-9 (1984-00-00)
  9. ? 9.09.19.2 Launert. E. Edible and Medicinal Plants. Hamlyn ISBN 0-600-37216-2 (1981-00-00)
  10. ? 10.010.110.2 Holtom. J. and Hylton. W. Complete Guide to Herbs. Rodale Press ISBN 0-87857-262-7 (1979-00-00)
  11. ? 11.011.111.2 Lust. J. The Herb Book. Bantam books ISBN 0-553-23827-2 (1983-00-00)
  12. ? 12.012.1 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
  13. ? 13.013.1 Mills. S. Y. The Dictionary of Modern Herbalism. ()
  14. ? 14.014.1 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
  15. ? 15.015.115.2 Davies. D. Alliums. The Ornamental Onions. Batsford ISBN 0-7134-7030-5 (1992-00-00)
  16. ? 16.016.1 Clapham, Tootin and Warburg. Flora of the British Isles. Cambridge University Press (1962-00-00)
  17. ? Philbrick H. and Gregg R. B. Companion Plants. Watkins (1979-00-00)
  18. ? Hatfield. A. W. How to Enjoy your Weeds. Frederick Muller Ltd ISBN 0-584-10141-4 (1977-00-00)
  19. ? Allardice.P. A - Z of Companion Planting. Cassell Publishers Ltd. ISBN 0-304-34324-2 (1993-00-00)
  20. ? Thomas. G. S. Perennial Garden Plants J. M. Dent & Sons, London. ISBN 0 460 86048 8 (1990-00-00)


Facts about "Allium ampeloprasum babbingtonii"RDF feed
Article is incompleteYes +
Article requires citationsNo +
Article requires cleanupYes +
Belongs to familyAlliaceae +
Belongs to genusAllium +
Has binomial nameAllium ampeloprasum babbingtonii +
Has common nameBabbington's Leek +
Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
Has edible partFlowers +, Leaves + and Root +
Has edible useUnknown use +
Has environmental toleranceHigh wind +
Has fertility typeBees + and Insects +
Has flowers of typeHermaphrodite +
Has hardiness zone6 +
Has material partUnknown part +
Has material useDye + and Repellent +
Has mature height1.8 +
Has mature width0.1 +
Has medicinal partUnknown part +
Has medicinal useAnthelmintic +, Antiasthmatic +, Anticholesterolemic +, Antiseptic +, Antispasmodic +, Cholagogue +, Diaphoretic +, Diuretic +, Expectorant +, Febrifuge +, Stimulant +, Stings +, Stomachic +, Tonic + and Vasodilator +
Has search nameallium ampeloprasum babbingtonii + and babbington's leek +
Has shade toleranceNo shade +
Has soil ph preferenceAcid +, Neutral +, Alkaline + and Very alkaline +
Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy +, Clay + and Heavy clay +
Has soil water retention preferenceWell drained +
Has sun preferenceFull sun +
Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
Has taxonomy nameAllium ampeloprasum babbingtonii +
Has water requirementsmoderate +
Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
PFAF toxicity notes migratedNo +
Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
Tolerates windYes +
Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
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