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Uses

Edible uses

Notes

The shoot tips are used as a tea substitute[1][2].

The cones can be ground into a fine powder, then mixed with fat and used as a confection[3]. It is said to be a delicacy and an aid to the digestion[3]. The resin from the trunk is used as a chewing gum[3]. It is said to treat bad breath[3]. Inner bark[3]. No more information is given, but inner bark is often dried, ground into a powder and then used with cereal flours when making bread etc[K].

Seeds[3]. No more information is given, but the seeds are very small and fiddly to use. Seeds of this genus are generally oily with a resinous flavour and can be eaten raw or cooked[K].

Unknown part

Inner bark

Seedpod

Material uses

The fragrant young leaves and twigs are used to repel moths or are burnt as an incense[4][5][6][3]. They were also ground into a powder and used to make a baby powder and perfumes[7][3].

A gum is obtained from the bark. It is antiseptic[4][5] and was chewed by the N. American Indians in order to clean the teeth[7]. It was also used to plug holes in canoes[7]. An infusion of the leaves is used as a hair tonic[3]. The leaves can also be placed in the shoes as a foot deodorant[3].

Wood - light, soft, not strong. It is little used except as a fuel and for pulp[4][5][8]. The native North American Indians used it for making chairs and insect-proof storage boxes[3]. It was also used as a fuel and was said to burn for a long time[3].

Medicinal uses(Warning!)

Antiseptic[4][5]. The gummy exudate that appears on the bark was soaked in water until soft and then applied to wounds[9].

An infusion of the resin has been used as an emetic to cleanse the insides[3]. The resin has also been chewed to treat bad breath[3]. A decoction of the bark is used as a tonic and in the treatment of colds and flu[3].

A poultice of the leaves has been used to treat chest colds and fevers[3]. An infusion has been taken to treat the coughing up of blood, which can be the first sign of TB, and as a laxative[3].

Ecology

Ecosystem niche/layer

Canopy

Ecological Functions

Nothing listed.

Forage

Nothing listed.

Shelter

Nothing listed.

Propagation

Seed - sow early February in a greenhouse or outdoors in March[10]. Germination is often poor, usually taking about 6 - 8 weeks[10]. Stratification is said to produce a more even germination so it is probably best to sow the seed in a cold frame as soon as it is ripe in the autumn[11][12]. The seed remains viable for up to 5 years if it is well stored[12]. When large enough to handle, prick the seedlings out into individual pots and grow them on for at least their first winter in pots. Plant them out into their permanent positions in late spring or early summer, after the last expected frosts. Alternatively, if you have sufficient seed, it is possible to sow in an outdoor seedbed. One report says that it is best to grow the seedlings on in the shade at a density of about 550 plants per square metre[10] whilst another report says that they are best grown on in a sunny position[11].

Practical Plants is currently lacking information on propagation instructions of Abies lasiocarpa. Help us fill in the blanks! Edit this page to add your knowledge.



Cultivation

Prefers a good moist but not water-logged soil[13]. Grows well in heavy clay soils. Very shade tolerant, especially when young, but growth is slower in dense shade[14]. Intolerant of atmospheric pollution[13]. Prefers slightly acid conditions down to a pH of about 5[15]. Prefers growing on a north-facing slope[15].

Occasionally planted for timber in N. Europe[16] but this species does not thrive in Britain[17]. It is a very cold-hardy tree but the milder winters of this country make it susceptible to damage by aphis and late frosts[13][17][14]. The sub-species A. lasiocarpa arizonica. (Merriam.)Lemmon. is growing somewhat better here[18]. Trees should be planted into their permanent positions when they are quite small, between 30 and 90cm in height. Larger trees will check badly and hardly put on any growth for several years. This also badly affects root development and wind resistance[15]. Plants are strongly outbreeding, self-fertilized seed usually grows poorly[15]. They hybridize freely with other members of this genus[15].

The crushed foliage has a balsam aroma[18].

Crops

Problems, pests & diseases

Associations & Interactions

There are no interactions listed for Abies lasiocarpa. Do you know of an interaction that should be listed here? edit this page to add it.

Polycultures & Guilds

There are no polycultures listed which include Abies lasiocarpa.

Descendants

Cultivars

Varieties

None listed.

Subspecies

None listed.

Full Data

This table shows all the data stored for this plant.

Taxonomy
Binomial name
Abies lasiocarpa
Genus
Abies
Family
Pinaceae
Imported References
Edible uses
Medicinal uses
Material uses & Functions
Botanic
Propagation
Cultivation
Environment
Cultivation
Uses
Edible uses
None listed.
Material uses
None listed.
Medicinal uses
None listed.
Functions & Nature
Functions
Provides forage for
Provides shelter for
Environment
Hardiness Zone
5
Heat Zone
?
Water
moderate
Sun
full sun
Shade
permanent shade
Soil PH
Soil Texture
Soil Water Retention
Environmental Tolerances
    Ecosystems
    Native Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Adapted Climate Zones
    None listed.
    Native Geographical Range
    None listed.
    Native Environment
    None listed.
    Ecosystem Niche
    Root Zone Tendancy
    None listed.
    Life
    Deciduous or Evergreen
    Herbaceous or Woody
    Life Cycle
    Growth Rate
    Mature Size
    25 x 4 meters
    Fertility
    ?
    Pollinators
    Flower Colour
    ?
    Flower Type

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    References

    1. ? 1.01.1 Kunkel. G. Plants for Human Consumption. Koeltz Scientific Books ISBN 3874292169 (1984-00-00)
    2. ? 2.02.1 Facciola. S. Cornucopia - A Source Book of Edible Plants. Kampong Publications ISBN 0-9628087-0-9 (1990-00-00)
    3. ? 3.003.013.023.033.043.053.063.073.083.093.103.113.123.133.143.153.163.173.183.19 Moerman. D. Native American Ethnobotany Timber Press. Oregon. ISBN 0-88192-453-9 (1998-00-00)
    4. ? 4.04.14.24.34.44.5 Uphof. J. C. Th. Dictionary of Economic Plants. Weinheim (1959-00-00)
    5. ? 5.05.15.25.35.45.5 Usher. G. A Dictionary of Plants Used by Man. Constable ISBN 0094579202 (1974-00-00)
    6. ? 6.06.1 Buchanan. R. A Weavers Garden. ()
    7. ? 7.07.17.27.3 Lauriault. J. Identification Guide to the Trees of Canada Fitzhenry and Whiteside, Ontario. ISBN 0889025649 (1989-00-00)
    8. ? 8.08.1 Sargent. C. S. Manual of the Trees of N. America. Dover Publications Inc. New York. ISBN 0-486-20278-X (1965-00-00)
    9. ? 9.09.1 Weiner. M. A. Earth Medicine, Earth Food. Ballantine Books ISBN 0-449-90589-6 (1980-00-00)
    10. ? 10.010.110.2 Sheat. W. G. Propagation of Trees, Shrubs and Conifers. MacMillan and Co (1948-00-00)
    11. ? 11.011.1 McMillan-Browse. P. Hardy Woody Plants from Seed. Grower Books ISBN 0-901361-21-6 (1985-00-00)
    12. ? 12.012.1 Dirr. M. A. and Heuser. M. W. The Reference Manual of Woody Plant Propagation. Athens Ga. Varsity Press ISBN 0942375009 (1987-00-00)
    13. ? 13.013.113.2 F. Chittendon. RHS Dictionary of Plants plus Supplement. 1956 Oxford University Press (1951-00-00)
    14. ? 14.014.1 Rushforth. K. Conifers. Christopher Helm ISBN 0-7470-2801-X (1987-00-00)
    15. ? 15.015.115.215.315.415.5 Huxley. A. The New RHS Dictionary of Gardening. 1992. MacMillan Press ISBN 0-333-47494-5 (1992-00-00)
    16. ? ? Flora Europaea Cambridge University Press (1964-00-00)
    17. ? 17.017.117.2 Bean. W. Trees and Shrubs Hardy in Great Britain. Vol 1 - 4 and Supplement. Murray (1981-00-00)
    18. ? 18.018.1 Mitchell. A. F. Conifers in the British Isles. HMSO ISBN 0-11-710012-9 (1975-00-00)
    19. ? Cite error: Invalid <ref> tag; no text was provided for refs named PFAFimport-60

    Cite error: <ref> tag with name "PFAFimport-229" defined in <references> is not used in prior text.

    "image:Abies lasiocarpa 26008.JPG|248px" cannot be used as a page name in this wiki.

    Facts about "Abies lasiocarpa"RDF feed
    Article is incompleteYes +
    Article requires citationsNo +
    Article requires cleanupYes +
    Belongs to familyPinaceae +
    Belongs to genusAbies +
    Has binomial nameAbies lasiocarpa +
    Has common nameSubalpine Fir +
    Has drought toleranceIntolerant +
    Has edible partUnknown part +, Inner bark +, Seed + and Seedpod +
    Has edible useGum +, Unknown use + and Tea +
    Has fertility typeWind +
    Has flowers of typeMonoecious +
    Has growth rateSlow +
    Has hardiness zone5 +
    Has imageAbies lasiocarpa 26008.JPG +
    Has lifecycle typePerennial +
    Has material partUnknown part +
    Has material useBaby care +, Deodorant +, Gum +, Hair care +, Incense +, Repellent + and Wood +
    Has mature height25 +
    Has mature width4 +
    Has medicinal partUnknown part +
    Has medicinal useAntihalitosis +, Antiseptic +, Emetic +, Foot care +, Laxative +, Poultice +, TB + and Tonic +
    Has primary imageAbies lasiocarpa 26008.JPG +
    Has search nameabies lasiocarpa + and subalpine fir +
    Has shade tolerancePermanent shade +
    Has soil ph preferenceAcid + and Neutral +
    Has soil texture preferenceSandy +, Loamy +, Clay + and Heavy clay +
    Has sun preferenceFull sun +
    Has taxonomic rankSpecies +
    Has taxonomy nameAbies lasiocarpa +
    Has water requirementsmoderate +
    Inhabits ecosystem nicheCanopy +
    Is deciduous or evergreenEvergreen +
    Is herbaceous or woodyWoody +
    Is taxonomy typeSpecies +
    PFAF cultivation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF edible use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF material use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF medicinal use notes migratedNo +
    PFAF propagation notes migratedNo +
    PFAF toxicity notes migratedYes +
    Tolerates nutritionally poor soilNo +
    Uses mature size measurement unitMeters +
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